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Full text of "California Garden, Vol. 58, No.6, December-January 1967-1968"

SAN DIEQO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 

FLORAL BUILDING, BALBOA PARK 

(Under the sponsorship of 
The Park and Recreation Dept., City of San Diego) 

Third Tuesday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 
Pres.: Mr. Virgil H. Schade 298-1949 

1633 Pennsylvania 

FLOWER ARRANGERS' GUILD OF SAN DIEGO 

First Thursday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Harry B. Cutler 466-7579 

4671 Toni Lane, S.D. 92115 

COORDINATING GROUPS 

FLORAL COMMITTEE, 200th ANNIVERSARY, Inc. 

Bi-monthly, 3rd Thursday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Joan Betts, Chairman, Alice Zukor, Co-chairman 

291-1969 
1600 Pacific Hwy, Rm. 801, S.D., Cal. 92101 

SAN DIEGO BOTANICAL GARDEN 
FOUNDATION, Inc. 

Second Thursday, Floral Building 
P.O. Box 12162, S. D.. Calif. 92112 
Pres.: Virgil Schade 298-1949 

1633 Pennsylvania 

AFFILIATE MEMBERS 1967 

COUNTY CIVIC GARDEN CLUB 

Meets every Thursday, 12m to I p.m. 
Garden House, Grape and 101 Civic Center 

Pres.: Mrs. Donald A. Innis 298-1690 

1827 Puterbaugh, S.D. 92103 
Rep.: James Saraceno 274-2628 

3366 Lloyd St., S.D. 92117 

GENERAL DYNAMICS GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: William D. Spann 278-2410 

4101 Mt. Bigelow Wy., S.D. 921 1 1 
Rep. Dir.: J. E. Henderson 274-1754 

3503 Yosemite, S.D. 92109 

MEN'S GARDEN CLUB OF SAN DIEGO CO. 

Fourth Monday, Floral Bldg., 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Jim D. Campbell 278-4372 

2903 Greyling Dr., S.D. 92123 
Rep.: Dr. J. W. Troxell 282-9131 

4950 Canterbury Drive, S.D. 92116 

ORGANIC GARDENING CLUB 

Third Friday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: C. Frank Carpenter 583-1064 

5281 Remington Rd., S.D. 92115 
Rep.: Mrs. Mary Panek 222-5031 

4680 Del Monte Ave., S.D. 92107 
POINT LOMA GARDEN CLUB 
First Friday, Floral Bldg., 10 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Harold A. Skinner 222-1211 

3530 Lowell, S.D. 92106 

Rep.: Mrs. Lorraine Warner 222-9133 

3044 N. Evergreen, S.D. 92110 
SAN DIEGO BONSAI SOCIETY, INC. 
Second Sunday, Floral Bldg., 1-5 p.m. 
Pres.: Mas Takanashi 264-8451 

6655 Detroit St., San Diego 
Rep.: Mrs. Helen G. Howe 
4767i/ 2 Lantana Dr.. S.D. 92105 281-1158 

SAN DIEGO CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 

First Saturday, Floral Building, 2 p.m. 

Pres.: Reuben V. Vaughan 223-7629 

1041 Le Roy St.. S.D. 92106 
Rep.: Frank Mousseau 

5955 Lauretta, S.D. 92110 295-9596 

SAN DIEGO CAMELLIA SOCIETY 

Second Friday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Samuel E. Foster 444-5314 

202 Carter, E| Caion 92020 

Rep.: Mrs. Lester Crowder 295-5871 

3130 Second St., S.D. 92103 

S.D. CHAPTER CALIF. ASS'N NURSERYMEN 

Second and Fourth Thursday, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: John Basney 273-4636 

4731 Conrad Ave., S.D. 92117 
Rep.: John Basney 273-4636 

4731 Conrad Ave., S.D. 92117 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY DAHLIA SOCIETY 

Fourth Tuesday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Gerald L. Lohmann 295-7645 

4564i/ 2 Arizona St., S.D. 92116 
Rep.: Mrs. R. M. Middleton 296-3246 

3944 Centre St., S.D. 92103 

SD-IMPERIAL COUNTIES IRIS SOCIETY 

Meets 3rd Sunday, Floral Bldg., 2:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Arthur B. Day 422-5172 

279 J St. Chula Vista 92010 

Rep.: Mrs. J. Otto Crocker 582-5316 

4749 Redlands Dr., S.D. 

SAN DIEGO COUNTY ORCHID SOCIETY 

First Tuesday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Robert Coats 469-6227 

7340 Santa Maria Dr., La Mesa 
Rep.: Byron Geer 279-1191 

5094 Mt. La Platta Dr., S.D. 921 17 

SAN DIEGO FUCHSIA SOCIETY 

Second Monday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: William C. Knotts 277-1188 

1912 David St., S.D. 921 1 1 
Rep.: Mrs. William Knotts 

1912 David St. S.D. 921 I I 977-1 I Rfl 



SAN DIEGO ROSE SOCIETY 

Third Monday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Harry B. Cutler 466-7579 

4671 Toni Lane, S.D. 
Rep.: Mrs. Felix White 264-4440 

5282 Imperial Ave., S.D. 92114 

SOUTHWESTERN GROUP, JUDGES' COUNCIL 
CALIFORNIA GARDEN CLUBS, INC. 

First Wednesday, Floral Building, 10:30 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Harry K. Ford 583-4320 

4851 Lorraine Dr., S.D. 92115 
Rep.: Mrs. Roland S. Hoyt 296-2757 

2271 Ft. Stockton Dr., S.D. 92103 

OTHER GARDEN CLUBS 

ALFRED D. ROBINSON BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Third Friday, Homes of Members, 10 a.m. 

Pres.: Miss Myrle Patterson 224-1572 

4310 Piedmont Dr., S.D. 92107 

BERNARDO BEAUTIFUL & GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, 1:30 Seven Oaks Community 
Center, Bernardo Oaks Dr., Rancho Bernardo 

Pres.: Fred W. Walters 748-1486 

12048 Callado Dr., S.D. 92128 

CARLSBAD GARDEN CLUB 

First Friday, VFW Hall, Carlsbad, 1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Daniel N. Kurily 729-6618 

1430 Forest Ave., Carlsbad 92108 

CHULA VISTA FUCHSIA SOCIETY 

Second Tuesday, Norman Park Recreation 
Center, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mr. August H. Goerke 420-3930 

481 Flower, Chula Vista 92110 
CHULA VISTA GARDEN CLUB 
Meets 3rd Wednesday 1:00 p.m. 
C.V. Woman's Club Bldg., 357 G St., C.V. 
Pres.: Mrs. Benjamin Tate 420-1700 

99 Second St., Chula Vista 92010 
CITY BEAUTIFUL OF SAN DIEGO 

Pres.: Mrs. Raymond E. Smith 488-0830 

4995 Fanuel St., Pacific Beach 92109 

CLAIREMONT GARDEN CLUB 

Meets Third Tuesday, 9:30 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Stanley Fletcher 276-2520 

3090 Chicago St., S.D. 92117 

CORONADO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 

Meets 1st Tuesday, Red Cross Bldg., 1113 Adella 
Lane 
Pres.: Capt. Richard W. Parker, U.S.N. Retired 

435-6454 
508 Glorietta Blvd., Coronado 921 18 

CROSS-TOWN GARDEN CLUB 

Third Tuesday, Knights of Columbus Hall, 
3827 43rd St., S.D. 92105, 8 p.m. 
Pres.: Charles Williams 284-2317 

4240 46th, S.D. 92115 
CROWN GARDEN CLUB OF CORONADO 
Fourth Thursday, Red Cross Bldg, 1113 Adella 
Lane, 9:30 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Robert H. Keehn 435-8268 

1 1 1 1 Coronado, Coronado 921 18 

DELCADIA GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, Encinitas Union Elementary 
School, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. I. F. Nichols 753-5409 

159 Diana, Leucadia 92046 

DOS VALLES GARDEN CLUB (PAUMA VLY.) 

Meets 2nd Tuesday, Pauma Valley Center 1:30 

Pres.: Mrs. R. B. Davidson 745-9445 

R. I, Box 361, Valley Center 92061 

ESCONDIDO GARDEN CLUB 

3rd Friday, Veterans Memorial Hall 1:00 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Lawrence Mineah 745-9629 

201 S. Upas, Escondido 
FALLBROOK GARDEN CLUB 
Last Thursday, Fallbrook Woman's Clubhouse, 
1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Roman E. Shore 728-7044 

1211 Pepper Tree Lane, Fallbrook 92028 
GROSSMONT GARDEN CLUB 
Second Monday, La Mesa Chamber of Commerce 
Bldg., University Ave., La Mesa 92041 
Pres.: Mrs. James Culver 466-6388 

8558 Boulder Dr., La Mesa 92041 

IMPERIAL BEACH GARDEN CLUB 

3rd Tuesday, Imperial Beach Civic Center, 
1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Chris Roberts 424-6936 

553 Spruce St., Imperial Beach 92032 

LAKESIDE GARDEN CLUB 

3rd Monday, Lakeside Farm School, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Loy M. Smith 443-3089 

9511 Farmington Dr., Lakeside 92040 

LA MESA GARDEN CLUB 

(Garden Sec. Womans' Club) 

3rd Thursday, La Mesa Women's Club, 1:00 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Allen W. Carpenter 583-7508 

5169 Ewing, S.D. 

LAS JARDINERAS 

Third Monday, 10 a.m. Homes of members 
Pres.: Mrs. James I. Robinson 223-0125 

3443 Whittier St., S.D. 92106 

LEMON GROVE WOMAN'S CLUB 

(Garden Section) 

First Tuesday, Lemon Grove Woman's Club 

House, I p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Hal Crow 466-3330 

■W;n Dnarro BA I a Moca 



MISSION GARDEN CLUB 

Meets First Monday, 8 p.m. 

Barbour Hall, Pershing and University 

Pres.: Dr. R. J. McBride 465-1311 

4635 Panorama Drive, La Mesa 
Rep.: Julia Bohe 282-7422 

3145 No. Mt. View Dr., S.D. 92116 

NATIONAL CITY GARDEN CLUB 

Third Wednesday, National City Community 
Bldg., 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Arliss A. Agnew 477-8416 

420 Twelfth St., National City 92050 

NORTH COUNTY ROSE SOCIETY 

Meets First Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. at 
Palomar College 

Pres.: James A. Kirk 748-3870 

15131 Espola Road, Poway 

NORTH COUNTY SHADE PLANT CLUB 

Second Sat., 1:30 p.m. Seacoast Hall, Encinitas 

Pres.: E. Grove Teaney 726-3728 

114 Natal Wy., Vista 

O. C. IT GROW GARDEN CLUB 

Second Wednesday, S. Oceanside School 
Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mr. Earl H. McPherson 729-1785 

3476 Pio Pico Dr., Carslbad, Calif. 92008 

PACIFIC BEACH GARDEN CLUB 

Meet second Monday, 7:30 p.m. Community 
Club House, Gresham and Diamond Sts., 
Pacific Beach 

Pres.: Mrs. Charles E. Domler 283-3642 

5158 Hastings Rd., S.D. 92116 

PALOMAR CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 

Third Saturday, I p.m., Palomar College Foreign 
Language Building, Room F22 

Pres. Mrs. Katie McReynolds 755-4047 

P.O. Box III, Del Mar 92014 

PALOMAR ORCHID SOCIETY 

Meets Third Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., Avocado 
Inn, 114 Hillside Terrace, Vista 
Pres.: Eugene A. Casey 753-3571 

932 Crest Drive, Encinitas 

POWAY VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 

2nd Wednesday, 9:30 a.m., Community Church 

Pres.: Mrs. Ervin Pringle 748-1894 

13517 Poway Rd. #H Poway 92064 

RANCHO SANTE FE GARDEN CLUB 

Second Tuesday — Club House, 2:00 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Edmund T. Price 756-2204 

Box 576, Rancho Santa Fe 92067 

SAN CARLOS GARDEN CLUB 

Fourth Tuesday, San Carlos Club, 6955 Golfcrest 

Pres. Mrs. Glenn F. Bliss 463-4349 

6275 Cowles Mountain, San Diego 92119 

SAN DIEGO BRANCH AMERICAN 
BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Fourth Monday, Barbour Hall - Univ & 
Pershing, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Eugene Cooper 295-7938 

4444 Arista Dr., S.D. 92103 

SAN DIEGO BROMELIAD SOCIETY 

Second Monday, 7:30 p.m. Meets at home of 
president 

Pres.: Mrs. Cleoves Hardin 469-3038 

9295 Harness Rd., Spring Valley 92077 

SAN DIEGO WOMEN'S CLUB 
Home & Garden Sec. 

Pres.: Mrs. Lawrence A. Larson 232-8231 

1468 C St., S.D. 
SAN DIEGUITO GARDEN CLUB 
Third Wednesday, Seacoast Savings Building, 
Encinitas, 10 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Waldo Vogt 755-4772 

773 Barbara Ave., Solana Beach 92075 

SAN MIGUEL BRANCH AMERICAN 
BEGONIA SOCIETY 

First Wed., Youth Center, Lemon Grove 
Pres.: Ferris Jones 466-0138 

4610 68th St., S.D. 
SANTA MARIA VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 

Second Monday, Ramona Women's Club House, 
5th and Main, 9:30 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Stanley MacKenzie 789-1135 

R. I, Box 949, Ramona 92065 

SANTEE WOMEN'S CLUB Garden Sec. 

Pres.: Mrs. Leon Roloff 448-0291 

9138 Willow Grove Ave., Santee 92071 

SWEETWATER JUNIOR GARDEN CLUB 

First Monday, 7:30 p.m. Meets at home of 
Temporary President 

Temp. Pres.: Cleoves Hardin 469-3038 

9195 Harness Rd., Spring Valley 92077 

VALLE GARDEN CLUB, POWAY 

Meets 3rd Thursday, 10 a.m. Homes of members 

Pres.: Mrs. Brown Thompson III 
16728 Espola Rd., Poway 92064 
VISTA GARDEN CLUB 

First Friday, Vista Rec. Center 1:00 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Daniel Mich 724-8020 

551 Morningside PI., Vista 92083 

VISTA MESA GARDEN CLUB 

Second Tuesday, 2 p.m. Family Association 

Center 

Pres.: Mrs. Clara Haskins 465-0910 

mzi ci d-=.j„ i = m „„ rn-^.,. eon^u: 






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SINCE 1909 
DECEMBER 1967 
JANUARY 1968 
VOL. 58, NO. 6 



50 c 



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USE THE HANDY FORM ENCLOSED IN THIS 
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San Diego Floral Association 

Balboa Park 
San Diego, California 92101 



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CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



A Message from the President 

of the San Diego Floral Association 



JLt is appropriate at this time of Christmas and New Year, a time of 
new beginnings, to say a few words about forthcoming changes in the 
Floral Association's long-beloved California Garden magazine. 

Gardens are places of colorful beauty, and we have made a de- 
cision to carry out that identification on the cover of our magazine, 
which from now on will feature timely four-color photos. We will add 
new departments to the publication from time to time in an attempt 
to bring the kind of information to our readers that will assist them in 
achieving the utmost satisfaction from their efforts in the garden. Also, 
we will be incorporating new style and layout ideas for effective pre- 
sentation. 

We have appointed Mrs. Virginia Norell, a long-time resident of 
San Diego, who brings many years of editorial and business experience 
with her, as the new editor of California Garden. In the coming 
year, she will develop the changes mentioned above, and we are looking 
forward to the 1968 issues. 

I would like to express our appreciation to our recently retired 
former editor, Miss Vera Morgan, for her years of dedication to 
California Garden, and to wish her many happy years of retirement 
in her new home at Grace Tower. 

My best wishes to all, for a very Merry Christmas and a Happy 
New Year. 



-VIRGIL H. SCHADE, President, 
San Diego Floral Association 





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PHOTOS 
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Japanese Iris 
in a garden, 
Golden Gate Park, 
San Francisco 



Photo, Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Cooper 



Japanese Irises for Color 



Because of long association with 
the popular bearded irises, most 
gardeners tend to think of every 
iris flower as having three petals which 
bend upward to form a dome and 
three alternate petals which droop 
downward to form a base for that 
dome. However, the Japanese irises do 
not fit this standard pattern. In the 
blossom of many Japanese irises, all 
six petals flare straight outwards to 
give the flower the shape of a dinner 
plate, with a diameter from six to 
twelve inches. Because of this dis- 
tinctive shape, the Japanese irises fre- 
quently are referred to as "flat tops" 
or as "flying saucers." But whatever 
they are called, these Oriental beauties 
provide an exotic and spectacular dis- 
play of color. Each expansive blossom 
is interwoven with intricate and de- 
lightful designs in pseudo-textures such 
as satin, organdy, and velvet. Hues 
may range from white and pink 



through orchids, violets, and blues. 
Combinations include blends, bicolors, 
and even tri-colors for variety. Petals 
of the many varieties are even frilled 
and ruffled. 

The Japanese irises are derived ex- 
clusively from the single Oriental spe- 
cies Iris kaempferi, which is a mem- 
ber of the apogon iris series Laevi- 
gatae. This Latin series nomenclature 
means "smooth" and probably refers 
to the glossy leaves which have no 
midrib. The cultural or garden his- 
tory of these irises is spread over a 
period of more than 500 years. Fac- 
tual information relative to their jour- 
ney through this time period is not 
readily available, but it is recorded 
that one variety, named for a Japanese 
family which owned it, passed from 
generation to generation of that family 
in the form of an inheritance. 

More than one hundred years ago, 
Matsudaira Showo described nearly 



Irregularities in the petals often undulate or change position in the petal 
from hour to hour. And during the course of a day, all the petals may 
change from a flared to a draped position. "Sea Crest," shown here, was 
photographed in San Diego County in September 1967 — proof that some 
Japanese irises ivill "rebloom" in Southern California. 

Photo by Thurmond 



by Thelma Carrington 



200 distinct varieties. These varieties 
were grouped into three main "forms." 
The Higo form is the better known of 
these three and came to be the basis 
for the development of the "Japs" in 
the United States. After decades of 
arduous efforts, the present day Ameri- 
can "Japs" show better coloration, 
more distinct patterns, greater branch- 




CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



ing, and more substance than any of 
the original Higo-form varieties from 
which they were derived. 

Strange to say, "Japs" are not yet 
widely grown in Southern California. 
This may be because they are some- 
what temperamental. But this exotic, 
richly-colored iris is not the prima 
donna that some gardeners believe. 
Granted, it takes more tender loving 
care from the gardener than do the 
spurias or the tall bearded irises, but 
its cultural requirements really are not 
too difficult. Any extra time and 
trouble that is given to them will be 
compensated by the discovery that 
these flowers extend the iris bloom- 
ing season several months. The 
lovely blossoms of this iris are un- 
paralleled as the basis for summer 
floral arrangements; they are in great 
demand for that precise reason. 

Plant specialists know that each type 
of plant thrives best under special 
treatment and conditions which suit 
the plant's needs. The special require- 
ments needed for the Japanese irises 
can be provided without undue effort. 
Initial preparation of the Japanese iris 
bed consists of digging in liberal 
amounts of leaf mold, peat moss, pine 
needles, or any other form of humus 
at least two weeks before the actual 
planting. In areas where alkaline con- 
ditions prevail naturally, a few pounds 
of soil sulphur also should be dug 
into the bed. This will insure the acid 
conditions which are necessary for 
healthy plants. 

Plant Promptly 

The irises should be planted 
promptly on receipt to minimize dam- 
age due to dehydration. Set the plants 
in a vertical position, crown up, under 




about two inches of rich, moist soil. 
The roots should be evenly spread and 
the surrounding soil firmly pressed 
down and wet down. Mark each plant 
with a sturdy, long lasting name tag. 
Water the plants frequently and feed 
them liberally with camellia food at 
monthly intervals until flower buds are 
visible on the bloom stalks, then dis- 
continue fertilizing until the last bloom 
has faded. During the fall months, 
the plants may be neglected and al- 
lowed to go dormant, if desired. 

In Japan, these irises often are raised 
in former rice paddies which are easily 
flooded during the growing season and 
which may be drained during the win- 
ter months. These are superb condi- 
tions for maximum growth and maxi- 
mum bloom size. A location near a 
pond or stream will help to satisfy 
the plants' wants for moisture. 

Another popular method of growing 
Japanese irises is planting individual 
plants in pots and then partially sub- 
merging them in shallow ponds of 
fertilized water. The fertilization is 
accomplished by dissolving soluble 
nutrients in the pond, adding addi- 
tional soluble fertilizer as needed to 
maintain a healthy looking blue-green 
color in the iris foliage. Under this 
method, too, fertilizing should be dis- 
continued when the buds appear. (If 
the fertilizing is continued into the 
blooming period, the blossoms may 
soften or "rot" even before they 
open.) 

Planting is possible either in early 
spring or fall; for those areas with 
severe winters, a spring planting is 
preferable. Once the plant has been 
established, rapid increase may be ex- 
pected. The "Japs" prefer a location 
in full sunlight in all except the hot 
desert climates. There, in the hot sun, 
the three foot high clumps of stiff 
foliage may receive a "sunburn" if not 
partially shaded. 

Although these irises take some time 
to become established, expert gardeners 
can pamper their plants and obtain 
fine blossoms the first summer after 
planting. My new plants usually take 
two years before their first bloom. 
After the last bloom has faded, the 
plants require less water — but never 



should be allowed to dry out com- 
pletely. 

Find Your Preference 

It is advisable, before selecting 
"Japs" for your personal garden, to 
tour around and see some of the many 
varieties which are available. For 
Californians, an excursion during late 
June to the Japanese iris garden in 
Golden Gate Park, San Francisco, and 
to the Japanese iris display garden at 
the University of California, Berkeley, 
provides a view of more Japanese iris 
varieties than may be seen any place 
in the state. 

Thus far, Japanese irises are not 
well enough known to be stocked in 
local nurseries. Most hobbyists who 
do not grow these plants have obtained 
them by mail order from catalogues 
of commercial iris growers. Catalogues 
which feature "Japs" may be obtained 
free of charge by postcard request ad- 
dressed to either 

Melrose Gardens, Rt. 1, Box 466 
Stockton, California 95205 

or to 
Walter Marx Gardens, Box 38, 
Boring, Oregon 97009 

Both of these catalogues offer a fine 
selection of varieties and colors. 

For those who do not intend to ex- 
hibit their irises, and who thus need 
not have named varieties, a simple 
method of obtaining plants is to grow 
them from seeds. Seeds should be 
planted in moist soil in the fall sea- 
son; they will germinate readily dur- 
ing the following spring; the first 
blooms may be expected during the 
plant's second summer. Several local 
hobbyists are now raising "Japs" from 
seed sent from Japan by Dr. Shuichi 
Hirao, who may be considered the 
world's foremost authority on this 
plant. 

With a few seeds or root cuttings 
for a start, and with a reasonable quan- 
tity of tender loving care added, you 
may be rewarded with an array of 
spectacular and exotic flowers — fan- 
tastically colored, ruffled, and flared. 
Many of your friends who see these 
beauties will promptly succumb to the 
"Japanese Iris Fever" which now is 
spreading among iris enthusiasts of 
this area. ■ 



Most dramatic for use in arrangements, the foliage, stalks, buds, blossoms 
of the Japanese Iris all lend impact to an artistic creation. The plant can be 
utilized without any supporting materials. This is the variety "GAY GAL- 
LANT ," as exhibited at the Southern California Exposition at Del Mar on 
July 3, 1967. 

Photo by Thurmond 



DECEMBER, 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



GREEN THUMB CALENDAR 

GARDENING 

MONTH-BY-MONTH 

IN SAN DIEGO 

Revised Edition, 1967, with Official 
Plant-Flower-Tree Guide for 200th 
Anniversary Floral Com. 1969 Cele- 
bration. 

For Your Gardening Pleasure and 
Gifts for Friends, 
Mail $1.10 Each 

to 

S. D. SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA ASSN. OFFICE 

P. O. Box 3175, S. D. 92103 

All Proceeds Benefit 
Childrens & Youth Concerts 



STATEMENT OF OWNERSHIP, MANAGEMENT 
AND CIRCULATION (Act of October 23, 1962; 
Section 4369, Title 39, United States Code). I. 
Date of Filing: September 9, 1966. Title of Publi- 
cation: California Garden. 3. Frequency of Issue: 
Bi-monthly. 4. Location of known office of publi- 
cation (Street, city, county, state, zip code): 
Floral Building, Balboa Park, San Diego, Cali- 
fornia 92101. Location of the headquarters or 
general business offices of the publishers (Not 
printers): Floral Building, Balboa Park, San Diego, 
California 92101. Names and addresses of Pub- 
lisher, Editor and Managing Editor: Publisher 
(Name and address): San Diego Floral Associa- 
tion, Balboa Park, San Diego, California 92101. 
Editor (Name and address): Virginia Casty Nor- 
ell, 9173 Overton Avenue, San Diego Cal fornia 
92123. Managing Editor (Name and address): 
Virginia Casty Norell, 9173 Overton Avenue, 
San Diego, California 92123. 7. Owner (If 
owned by corporation, its name and address 
must be stated and also immediately thereunder 
the names and addresses of stockholders owning 
or holding I per cent or more of total amount 
of stock. If not owned by a corporation, the 
names and addresses of the individual owners 
must be given. If owned by a partnership or 
other unincorporated firm, its name and address, 
as well as that of each individual must be given.) 
Name: San Diego Floral Association, Floral Build- 
ing, Balboa Park, San Diego, California 92101. 
8. Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other 
security holders owning or holding I per cent or 
more of total amount of bonds, mortgages or 
other securities (If there are none, so state): 
None (Non-profit organization). 

10. This item must be completed for all publi- 
cations except those which do not carry advertis- 
ing other than the publisher's own and which are 
named in Sections 132.231, 132.232, and 132.233, 
Postal Manual (Sections 4355a, 4355b, and 4356 of 
Title 39, United States Code). A. Total number copies 
printed (Net press run): 12,400. Average number 
copies each issue during preceding 12 months, 
2,066; single issue nearest to filing date, 2,000. 
B. Paid Circulation: I. Sales through dealers and 
carriers, street vendors and counter sales: Average 
number copies each issue during preceding 12 
months, 180; single issue nearest to filing date, 
160. 2. Mail Subscriptions: Average number copies 
each issue during preceding 12 months, 1,359; 
single issue nearest to filing date, 1,267. C. 
Total Paid Circulation: Average number copies 
each issue during preceding 12 months, 1,53?; 
single issue nearest to filing date, 1,517. D. 
Free Distribution (including samples) by mail, car- 
rier or other means: Average number copies each 
issue during preceding 12 months. 270; single issue 
nearest to filing date, 225. F. Total Distribution 
(Sum of C and D): Average number copies each 
issue during preceding 12 months, 1,829; single 
issue nearest to filing date, 1,800. F. Office use, 
left-over, unaccounted, spoiled after printing: 
Average number copies each issue during preced- 
ing 12 months, 237; sinqle issue nearest to filing 
date, 200. G. Total (Sum of E & F— should equal 
net press run shown in A): Average number copies 
each issue during preceding 12 months, 2,066; 
single issue nearest to filing date, 2,000. I cer- 
tify that the statements made by me above are 
correct and complete. VIRGINIA C. NORELL. 




Polyscias Paniculata 



The araliads are those marvelously 
diverse, primarily tropical components 
of the Araliaceae, a group which con- 
tains such plants as Ivy (Hedera), and 
Rice-Paper Plants, Tetrapanax. In re- 
cent times a gratifying number of 
them have become popular for use as 
indoor or greenhouse specimens, 
though previously they were largely 
confined to gardens where frosts do 
not occur. 

A particularly desirable and showy 
araliad is among this group, being of- 
fered by several commercial dealers at 
this time. This is generally known as 
the Florida Aralia, since it has long 
been extensively utilized as a quick- 
growing hedge plant here. It is, how- 
ever, a native of the Mascarene Islands, 
in the Indian Ocean, and is botanically 
known as Polyscias paniculata (pol-/j\r- 
ee-ass pa-nik-yoo-/^-ta). 

Like many variegated members of 
this unique aggregation, the Polyscias 
exhibits extremes of variation, even on 
the same individual. In the accompany- 
ing photograph, one can see leaflets 



A Showy Araliad 

By Alex D. Hawkes 

ranging from almost completely cream- 
colored to almost wholly green or 
green with marginal white or cream- 
white vegetation. 

Propagation of this plant is of the 
easiest. The woody stems — which in 
robust specimens may attain heights of 
twelve feet or so — are severed, and 
stuck into the ground (even poor rocky 
soils). They are kept watered, and 
quickly root and continue to grow, so 
that "instant hedges" can be acquired 
with only a modicum of effort and at- 
tention. When confined to pots or 
other containers, a moderately rich soil, 
well-drained preferably, suits the 
species well. Bright light develops the 
character of the foliage best, though 
care should be taken that the new 
sprouts do not become sunburned. Un- 
due fertilizing can cause overly elon- 
gate growths, which rob the specimens 
of their innate beauty. 

It should be noted that some per- 
sons are somewhat allergic to this and 
other araliads, and a slight skin rash 
can result from contact with the coarse 
leaves. ■ 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




Try an arrangement— 
your ingenuity will surprise you 





• Come to one of the San Diego 

Floral Association's classes in 

flower arrangement for an exciting 

demonstration of another way to 

enjoy the beauty hidden in your 

garden. Mrs. J. R. Kirkpatrick 

is the teacher — a joy to behold 

at her art. (See page 2 for time.) 



Flowers, leaves, a bare branch, 
expressive figurines, an unexpected 
container — let your imagination go, 
and see how artistic you really are ! 



Photos on this page from 

Collection of Mr. and 

Mrs. Eugene Cooper 



DECEMBER, 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 




WINNING 

AT 

SHOWS 



Some Unwritten Considerations For Exhibitors 



by Donald A. Wilson 



• On the next jew 

pages, read how 

it's done and what's 

involved 



Having been asked to write an 
article on the subject of "Prep- 
paration for the Rose Show," I 
agreed, if allowed to select those fa- 
cets of the subject of current interest 
to me and (I hope) to the reader. As 
a sporadic and relatively unsuccessful 
exhibitor over the past fifteen years, 
I feel eminently qualified to give 
advice. However, since I must bring 
to bear an inquiring and analytical 
approach on my professional problems, 
this same aproach to the problems of 
exhibiting has led to some interesting 
and often overlooked conclusions 
which I will proceed to state and 
justify here. 

To begin with, don't expect me to 
discourse at length on the subjects 
of horticulture, pest control, flower 
grooming and transportation to the 
show. These have been covered very 
well indeed in past issues of the 
California Garden. The basic theme 
of this paper is that if each of a group 
of potential hardware winners knows 
how to grow, groom and transport 
roses equally well, then it must take a 
little something to insure success. I 
think we must agree that of the 100 
or so exhibitors in any average show, 
at least one-half of these are almost 



equally proficient in these capabilities. 
Then what are the factors which allow 
names to appear with discouraging 
frequency on the trophy table? These 
factors can be grouped under several 
general headings. Suppose I list these 
and then try to explain my point of 
view concerning each. 

SELECTION OF VARIETIES 

Unless you are an old-timer, who 
has moved recently, it is practically im- 
possible to take full advantage of this 
point. For example, before you plant 
your first rose bush, you should have 
enough experience to decide whether 
you want to aim for Queen of the 
Show or Sweepstakes. One can pick up 
a variety of ribbons and hardware, in- 
cidental to the quest for one of these 
two top awards, but your selection of 
varieties and number of each will de- 
termine which you are most liable to 
win. Some people occasionally win 
both but not very often. The sweep- 
stakes winner only accidentally wins 
Queen of the Show. 

Suppose you would like to go out 
for Sweepstakes. Since, in each color 
class you will be competing with one 
or two people of equal ability, it will 



10 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



behoove you to enter every class which 
counts towards the Sweepstakes total. 
You must therefore grow about three 
bushes in each color class and three in 
each named variety class likely to be 
segregated. Don't waste your time with 
singles, miniatures, climbers or old- 
fashioned roses, because these in gen- 
eral don't count. However, it is im- 
perative to have three each of russets, 
mauve, light yellow, medium yellow, 
dark yellow, and red blend. Your com- 
petition here is light. If you can man- 
age an entry of three or six in each of 
these odd classes, you are practically a 
shoo-in. Notice that you are bound to 
have a lot of "dogs," poor bushes, etc., 
and you must not overburden yourself 
with a lot of the lovely pinks and pink 
blends you might otherwise get. You 
can't afford them. Your chances are bet- 
ter with just three bushes in each class. 
Even this amounts to about 150 bushes, 
including floribundas and grandifloras. 
So, you see if you have a modest gar- 
den of 100-200 bushes, you can't af- 
ford to have what you like if you want 
to improve your statistics in the quest 
for Sweepstakes. This point might also 
explain why you haven't won a sweep- 
stakes award in all this time. 

Almost conversely, if you want to try 
for Queen of the Show, best three, 
best six or some of the more selective 
trophies for excellence of one or a few 
blooms, then you must select carefully 
a relatively few varieties of superlative 
show potential and get six to twelve of 
each variety. Don't worry about color 
class — you are competing for single 
bloom excellence — not sweepstakes. 
You will never win sweepstakes except 
accidentally. Statistically you will have 
more potential from which to select a 
few perfect blooms if you have a num- 
ber of each of several excellent varie- 
ties. It is as simple as that. Queen of 
the Show is more often won by the ex- 
hibitor who has a modest garden, al- 
though to be a consistent winner, he 
too must have 100 or more bushes. Un- 
fortunately, he, too, cannot afford to 
expend his energy with singles, climb- 
ers, miniatures or old-fashioned roses. 

Other things to be considered in the 
quest for points are the choices as to 
whether to use your limited garden 
space in planting hybrid teas, grandi- 
floras or floribundas. As things now 
stand, you can get much more mileage 
out of a stand of grandifloras than any- 
thing else, remembering that most 
shows allow two complete sections for 
grandifloras, — one for naturally grown 
sprays and one for singles (disbudded 
or not) . I amused myself the other day 
adding up sweepstakes points one 





H.T. Points 


G.F. Points 


FL. Points 


Trophies Available 


Rose Society 


Available 


Available 


Available 


H.T. 


G.F. FL. 


#1 


441 (63%) 


162 (23%) 


96(14%) 


13 


8 4 


#2 


187 (49%) 


117 (31%) 


75(20%) 


2 


5 2 


#3 


405 (48%) 


321 (38%) 


117 (14%) 


14 


5 2 






TABLE 


I 







could get by winning in each section 
in each of the three major Southern 
California shows and then I compared 
these numbers with the number of dif- 
ferent varieties on the market accord- 
ing to the most recent ARS Buyer's 
Guide. (See Table I above.) 

Now let us compare the percentages 
in this table with the percentages of va- 
rieties commercially available. Accord- 
ing to the Buyers Guide, there are 661 
varieties of H.T.'s, 40 varieties of 
G.F.'s and 252 varieties of FL's on the 
market for percentages of the total 
equal to 69%, 4% and 27% respec- 
tively. This means, of course, that 69% 
of the total varieties available (H.T.'s) 
can garner an average of 53% of 
sweepstakes points, only 4% (G.F.'s) 
of all varieties can get you 31% of the 
average sweepstakes points and it takes 
27% of the total varieties to get you 
but 16% of the total points in flori- 
bundas. I think this proves my long- 
held contention that the rose show 
schedule unwittingly places entirely too 
much emphasis on grandifloras at ex- 
pense of hybrid teas and floribundas, 
especially on the trophy table. Con- 
versely, it would be well for the ex- 
hibitor to have about 1/3 of his garden 
planted in grandifloras to take avantage 
of this fact. 

WHAT ABOUT THE JUDGES ? 

The official judges' manual by C. H. 
Lewis states as the first rule, "judging 
is based on a comparison of the ap- 
proach to perfection of the individual 
variety." Now this is not the clearest 
statement in the world but I interpret 
it as meaning that the individual rose 
which comes closest to attaining the 
perfect characteristics of that variety 
should win over all others, regardless 
of other considerations. Don't you be- 
lieve it! We all know that a single or 
semi-double has practically no chance 



even though it might be classed as a 
hybrid tea. But did you know that the 
ovoid, globular or cupped forms have 
practically no chance against the point- 
ed or urn-shaped forms? Watch the 
winners at your next show to see what 
I mean. Judges tend to fall back on 
the oft-quoted definition of an exhibi- 
tion rose as "gracefully shaped with 
sufficient petals, symmetrically ar- 
ranged in an attractive circular outline, 
tending towards a high center." How- 
ever, remember this is but a popular 
interpretation of the rule I quoted 
earlier. Conversely, I have seen classes 
set up by show committees, specifying 
this "exhibition" type (with the high 
center) won by urn shaped specimens. 
I suppose it helps to be a mind reader. 

Surprisingly enough, I haven't found 
anything unusual in local judging idio- 
syncrasies as regards color, substance 
and stem and foliage except for the 
controversial aspects of disbudding. It 
is a personal matter, I suppose, but I 
believe that the present preference for 
a very floriferous floribunda spray re- 
sulting from central disbudding does 
not adhere to the best principles of 
rose judging. For example, the best 
floribunda in one of the shows last 
year was judged to be a spray of Cecile 
Brunner that had about twenty blooms 
and no leaves. It won over many lovely 
but more modest blooms and bud 
sprays any one of which seemed su- 
perior to me. 

Size is another judging factor that 
does not always work in your favor. 
Lewis, for example, says "a large-sized 
specimen bloom complimented by stem 
and foliage proportionately in size to 
the bloom denotes the skill and excel- 
lent cultural habits of the grower. Such 
a specimen should win over a smaller 
sized specimen which might indicate 
improper feeding or not as careful and 
regular habits of culture." Another 
factor regulating size, of course, is local 



DECEMBER, L 967 - JANUARY, 1968 



11 



climate. With comparable cultural hab- 
its, roses of the same variety grown 
along the cool coast will develop more 
slowly and attain a larger size before 
opening than those grown in the 
warmer, drier inland areas. However, 
if you have some of these "super" 
blooms, no matter how perfect, don't 
expect them to win over averaged sized 
blooms of equal perfection. Too many 
judges (and others) will accuse you of 
using gibberellic acid, antibiotics, plant 
hormones, vitamins, secret formulas or 
anything else they can imagine, rather 
than admit that cultural habits and/ or 
climate might be responsible. As a re- 
sult I have discontinued my practice of 
foliage spraying every morning with 
homeopathic doses of nutrients. It 
finally became evident that I wasn't 
getting anywhere partly because my 
roses were too big. 

CLIMATOLOGY 

I have discussed the effect of climate 
on development of bloom size. In this 
context I have reference to the climate 
to be expected during the morning of 
the show, between the time you start 
to work on your entries and the time 
the judges are studying the blooms to 




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decide the winners. The best and easi- 
est situation to deal with is that in 
which temperature, wind and humidity 
at the show are similar to those in your 
garden. The worst situation to handle 
is that where the show area is sunny, 
dry and windy and you are trying to 
get some refrigerated roses in perfect 
state for showing. For best results, 
there is nothing quite so good as past 
experience in the particular show and 
a detailed knowledge of the behavior 
of each of your varieties. There is no 
other factor, where the "art" of the 
game shows up as much as it does 
here. There are no hard and fast rules 
although it can be said that buds must 
be considerably tighter for transport 
and show at Rose Hills, for example, 
than at San Diego and Pasadena. Even 
so, luck plays a large part. To be per- 
fect for judging at Rose Hills, a fast 
opening bloom like Thanksgiving 
should be pretty tight, whereas a slow- 
er opening bloom like Tropicana or 
Granada would be much easier esti- 
mated. We can state without fear of 
contradiction that it is a waste of time 
to take blooms just at or past their 
prime, to any show. They must be at 
that unknown point just on this side of 
prime when packed for transportation. 

PSYCHOLOGICAL FACTORS 

Here, I intend to caution you to 
avoid some of the pitfalls that often 
trap the unwary into wasting his time. 
At the most you have only about three 
hours after arriving at the show site to 
get all your blooms entered. If you are 
after Queen or "best" of show in cer- 
tain categories, you don't have much of 
a problem since you can spend all of 
this time with a relatively few blooms. 
However, if you are a Sweepstakes 
point contender, you might have as 
many as 300 blooms in as many as 50 
classes, to enter. You absolutely must 
have as much of the work done the day 
before, as possible. Your tags must be 
all filled out for each class for which 
you know you have an entry. Each rose 
must be labelled because no matter 
how smart you think you are, things 
get most confusing at the last minute. 
If you don't have a spouse or com- 
panion to run errands, get one. Don't 
lift your eyes from your work, don't 
engage anyone in conversation — you 
don't have time. Trying for Sweep- 
stakes is no game for anyone with 
heart trouble or a nervous stomach. 

When you make out your tags, be 
sure and have enough official ARS tags 
at home even if you have to buy some 
from the ARS ahead of time. Every 
chance you get to replenish your stock 



—do so. You can be as fancy as you 
want in filling out those blanks which 
are covered up when the entry is being 
judged, but the space for variety name 
should be filled in with a pencil and 
written in a nondescript manner. One 
year, I got the bright idea that since 
a show is as much for the benefit of 
the paying visitor as for the exhibitor 
I very carefully printed the name of 
the variety in black india ink with a 
printer's pen, so that the visitor could 
read the name without a magnifying 
glass or an interpreter. You wouldn't 
believe the comments I overheard to 
the effect that this guy was trying to 
impress the judges and that they could 
all tell who entered these blooms, etc., 
etc. I didn't win anything that time, 
probably because of this point, so I 
don't do that anymore. Also, unless 
you really are an altruistic nut, you 
won't waste your time entering odd 
ball varieties, even though you know a 
lot of people might like to see what 
they are like. Every waste motion is 
lost time which might better be spent 
polishing that last leaf, finding that 
last aphid, or carefully clipping that 
last brown edge from a petal. 

In spite of everything I have written 
here, don't be discouraged. Remember 
that you can win Queen of the Show, 
Best Three or many of the other tro- 
phies by going after them and not 
sweepstakes points. Hysteria comes 
from trying too hard to enter all the 
good ones you have instead of trying 
to select only a few of the best. On 
the other hand, our shows wouldn't be 
very big or nearly as interesting if it 
were not for some of us hysterical nuts 
who know better but continue to haul 
the roses in by the truckful. If we win 
anything it's just accidental, but we 
have a lot of fun. ■ 



RAINFORD 

I" lower Shop 




[L<i@9 



Flowers for all Occasions 
3334 Fifth Ave. 233-7101 



12 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




MRS. JOHN F. RILEY (JO ANN) with her Tri-Color 
Lime Tree table arrangement and her First Place "Treas- 
ure Chest" from the recent Crown Garden Club's Fall 
Flower Show. Mrs. Riley also won the sweepstakes 
award, and wrote this article giving us some valuable 
ideas about shows. 



Recipe for a 
successful flower show 



by Joann Riley 



PHOTO BY TOMMY LARK. CORONADO 



"W 



■here is the sixth pedestal 
for 'Suspended Elegence?' 
Who has the Class cards? 
Are you sure these niches are 28" 
wide? Is Joann running off the pro- 
grams?" — these and fifty other small 
problems, typical of getting ready for 
a show, came up in November as the 
Crown Garden Club of Coronado pre- 
pared for its eighth Fall Flower Show. 

Each year for nine years, people 
have shown their appreciation by ap- 
pearing at the events in ever greater 
numbers. Why? How did it happen? 
The show is free; a gift to the com- 
munity. But there are some valid 
reasons that this situation has come 
about. 

The essential ingredients must be in 
correct proportion to insure repeated 
success. The club president, Mrs. 
Robert H. Keehn, sets the pace. She 
has a sense of humor and an ability to 
pick chairmen who react well under 
pressure and who can enjoy the job 
they must do. 

The Chairman of the show was 
Mrs. John H. Brickley; the Co-Chair- 
man, Mrs. Gordon R. Barnett; the 
Artistic and Horticulture Chairmen, 
Mrs. H. G. Sherman and Mrs. Harvey 
Miller; and the Staging Chairman was 
Mrs. J. Dunham Reilly (who, inci- 
dentally, did her fabulous job from a 
wheel chair). These, plus the twelve 
class chairmen and an assortment of 



husbands were all at the Coronado 
Women's Club at 8:00 a.m. sharp the 
Friday before the two-day show, prov- 
ing they knew their jobs and were 
prepared to execute them. 

Generosity with time, effort and 
ideas is an element necessary for a 
successful flower show. Anita Halpern 
and Betty Keehn were placing their 
entries in the "Precious Jewels" minia- 
ture class and Betty admired Anita's 
entry but suggested kindly that a pink 
base would tie in the two small rhine- 
stones with the tiny cloisonne vase. 
After a search at home, the only pink 
material Anita could find to cut the 
base was the lining of her Mr. John 
hat. Anita Halpern was thrilled to win 
her first blue ribbon in a flower show 
with her miniature; and Betty Keehn 
was happy with her red ribbon. The 
success of our newer members height- 
ens their interest in flowers and gar- 
dening and that is the purpose of 
garden clubs and flower shows, a main 
ingredient the Crown Garden Club 
strives for. 

Participation a major element 

Participation by the entire member- 
ship is yet another element for a well- 
received show. Members should be 
encouraged to enter the artistic section 
through workshops and familiarity 
with complete arrangements. Our club 



has a Flower Arranging Chairman and 
the coffee table at each meeting has a 
lovely arrangement. We are also for- 
tunate in that the owner of one of 
Coronado's loveliest gift shops is a 
founder of our club. No one would 
enter an arrangement less attractive 
than those appearing in "The Bayberry 
Tree" windows. 

Each member was contacted by both 
an artistic chairman and, more im- 
portantly, by a member of the Horti- 
culture committee. It is our belief that 
everyone has in his garden an entry 
for horticulture. That section has al- 
ways been one of the strong points of 
our Fall show. 

Those indispensable men 

For the final spice in Crown Garden 
Club's recipe for a successful Flower 
Show we add . . . men. Men who can 
cheerfully erect backings for table 
classes, men who can fathom our 
hanging-basket pipe abortion, men 
who can assemble our jig-saw niches 
and men who can cheer our spirits 
late Friday evening. These sweet hus- 
bands are long overdue for medals of 
appreciation. . . or Awards of Dis- 
tinction. 

The happy winners 

Mrs. John F. Riley took the Tri- 
Color Award for her lime-tree table 



DECEMBER, 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



13 



arrangement, the Award of Distinction 
for her Holiday Door depicting three 
kings, and the Sweepstakes ribbon for 
winning the most blue ribbons in the 
artistic section. Mrs. Isham Linder 
won the Creativity Award for her 
Christmas mantle. 

Mrs. William T. Finley took top 
honors in the horticulture section with 
her Croton, judged best in show. She 
also was awarded the Sweepstakes rib- 
bon for the most blue ribbons in the 
section. 

Horticulture blue ribbon winners in- 
cluded Mrs. Robert H. Keehn's fuch- 
sia, Mrs. Ben H. Berry's roses, Mrs. 
Walter F. Madden's succulent, Mrs. 
John K. Wells' flowering hanging 
basket, Mrs. Don F. Smith's African 
violet, Mrs. R. J. Baum's pyracantha, 
Mrs. George Bauslaugh's berried 
shrubs, Mrs. M. W. Freund's fruits, 
Mrs. E. D. Ingold's loquat, Mrs. J. K. 
Clifford's chrysanthemums, Mrs. Sam 
H. Wood's potted rapheolepis, Mrs. R. 
L. Rutter's cosmos, Mrs. W. J. C. Ag- 
new's bird of paradise, Mrs. R. L. 
Brummage's limes, Mrs. G. L. Clark's 
dish garden and Mrs. Clifford Lenz's 
hanging foliage. 

First place winners in the Artistic 
section were: Rarest Miniatures, Mrs. 
J. M. Campbell; Sparkling Stones, 
Mrs. H. Halpern; Holiday Hospitality, 
Mrs. John F. Riley; Beauteous Light, 
Mrs. Isham Linder; Golden Harvest, 
Mrs. O. D. T. Lynch; Spiritual Treas- 
ures, Mrs. W. J. C. Agnew; Brilliance, 
Mrs. Anthony Trent; Celestial Crown, 
Mrs. Ben H. Berry; Oriental Opulence, 
Mrs. Gordon R. Barnett; Treasure 
Chests, Mrs. John F. Riley; Beginners' 
Radiance, Mrs. George L. Heap; Sus- 
pended Elegance, Mrs. C. W. Folkers, 
and Christmas Eve, Mrs. John F. Riley. 
In the Junior Section, 12 years and 
under, first place was taken by David 
Linder, and in the over- 12 group, 
Diane Celustka won first place. 

Just as in the Show of Life, a suc- 
cessful flower show is the result of 
prudent, previous planning, general 
good humor and generosity and a sub- 
limation of individual desires for the 
general good of the Show. These are 
common ingredients not impossible to 
attain. Try a show, and we hope you, 
too, are successful ! ■ 



Christmas Flowers: 
Lore and Legend 

While thousands of Ameri- 
cans will be saying "Merry 
Christmas" with flowers this 
year, few may realize that the Druids 
of ancient Britain, who lived 2,000 
years ago, believed that mistletoe was 
sacred to the goddess of love — thus 
our modern custom of kissing under 
the mistletoe. 

According to legend, when a lad 
claims his kiss under the mistletoe, he 
must remove a berry and give it to the 
grateful maiden. When the last berry 
is removed from the plant, the mistle- 
toe loses its power and no more kisses 
may be bestowed beneath it. It's also 
said that if a girl is kissed as many 
times as there are berries, she will be 
married within a year! 

Biblical Implications of Holly 

The use of holly as a decoration at 
Christmas time also can be traced back 
to antiquity — and many believe that 
the name is derived from the word 
"holy." In Germany, where holly is 
called Christdorn, there is a legend 
that this thorn was used for the cruci- 
fixion crown. 

Another tale about holly relates the 
story of Joseph of Arimathea and 
eleven of his followers who came to 
convert some heathens. While preach- 
ing to them on Christmas day, he dug 
his staff into the ground and it im- 
mediately burst into life and blossom. 
A church was dedicated on the spot, 
and this miraculous thorn of holly con- 
tinued to grow, blooming always on 
Christmas day. 

The Poinsettia 

The flower that has become one of 
the best-known symbols of the Christ- 
mas season is the star-shaped Poin- 
settia. So popular in this country are 
these scarlet-leaved blooms that the 
Florists' Transworld Delivery Associa- 
tion reports wiring more poinsettias 
than any other holiday floral offering. 

There are also many legends sur- 
rounding this Christmas-colored bloom. 
One tale relates how a poor Mexican 
girl was heartbroken because she had 



CURTIS COLEMAN CO. REALTORS 

SINCE 1913 



SALES 



LEASES 



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PROPERTY MANAGEMENT 



Suite 2100, United States National Bank Bldg. 
Centre City, San Diego 1, Calif. 233-6557 



nothing of value or beauty to offer 
the Virgin. In desperation she plucked 
some scrawny roadside weeds and 
placed them at the feet of the holy 
statue. They were immediately trans- 
formed into scarlet brilliance. The 
poinsettia plant, brought to this coun- 
try from Mexico over 125 years ago 
by Dr. Joel Poinsett, is still called by 
many "Elor de Noche Buena" — flower 
of the holy night. 

Other favorite Christmas flowers 
have fascinating stories behind them. 
Did you know, for instance, that the 
Christmas daisy is not really a daisy — 
but an aster? It's a fact! But this is 
no more unusual than the history of 
the Christmas rose — which during 
Greek times was thought to be a rem- 
edy for madness ! 

The Christmas Rose 

According to one legend, the rose 
came to be associated with Christmas 
on the very night that Christ was born. 
A little shepherdess, saddened because 
she had no gift to offer the Child of 
Bethlehem, went back to tending her 
flocks when suddenly an angel ap- 
peared. As the angel waved a lily thai- 
he carried, the ground was covered 
with Christmas roses — which the girl 
joyfully gathered and carried to Christ's 
manger. The Holy Child turned from 
the gems and gold of the magi, reached 
forth His tiny hands for the blossoms, 
and smiled as the shepherdess heaped 
them at His feet. 

Whether you're in the midst of 
decorating your home with traditional 
Christmas greens and flowers — or 
choosing roses, poinsettias or holiday 
bouquets to send loved ones — you can 
be sure of one thing: flowers that an- 
nounce the season's joys bring a glow- 
ing delight and a sense of well-being 
and warmth to all those who come in 
contact with them — a joyous heritage 
from the past in honor of the Prince 
of Peace. ■ 







Alice and Allan Zukor 

Validated Customer Parking at Rear of Store 
733 Broadway 239-1228 



14 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



A Thursday Club idea: "Gardens are not 
merely places to be admired, but should also 
be places in which to live and play." 



The Thursday Club Invests in Civic Beauty 



by Mabel Pillsbury 



Love of beauty and concern for 
our civic environment are back 
of the gardening achievements 
of the Thursday Club. Like many a 
kindred organization, the club feels a 
responsibility for contributing to the 
welfare of the community. Generous 
gifts have been made to the USO, the 
Children's Hospital, and at the Christ- 
mas season to servicemen in Vietnam 
and patients at Edgemoor Geriatric 
Hospital. But this is not enough. As 
the Bible tells us, "Man does not live 
by bread alone." 

Respecting the role of beautiful sur- 
roundings in the enrichment of life, 
the club has provided funds for re- 
furbishing a lovely fountain in Balboa 
Park, for handsome appointments at 
the entryway to historic Presidio Park, 
a block of theatre-type seats in Balboa 
Park Bowl, and development of a 
children's playground in Pepper Tree 
Grove. 

At the heart of the club's interest 
in horticulture is the vibrant, colorful, 
and timeless garden that affords a per- 
fect setting for the 40-year-old Thurs- 
day Clubhouse in a triangular block at 
1224 Santa Barbara Street, Point Loma. 
Mature trees, palms, and shrubs lend 
character and stability to the landscap- 
ing, while a host of young trees, 



* Where the botanical name is not 
well known, the common name is 
used and the botanical name appears 
in parenthesis. 



shrubs, and perennials impart youthful 
freshness. 

A Garden for all Seasons 

It is an informal garden, one for all 
seasons. Flowering material is never 
overpowering, yet there are always 
splashes of color to delight the eye. 
First in bloom are the beds of Indian 
Hawthorn* (Raphiolepis Indica), a 
variety appropriately named Spring- 
time, followed by earth-hugging fleecy 
clouds of Breath of Heaven (Diosma) . 
Then the eye is drawn upward as the 
colorful Silk Oaks (Grevillea robusta) 
from far-away Australia deck their 
limbs in orange and brown. Before 
this scene fades, California lilac 
(Ceanothus) brightens the landscape 
with cascades of misty blue reminiscent 
of a Maxfield Parrish painting. Sum- 
mer is heralded by the flowering Euca- 
lyptus (E. pcifolia) in rich tones of 
red and orange. Then the long season 
of the Oleander (Nerium oleander) 
offers to the wind a myriad of flowers 
in an artful blend of peach and gold 
from the comparatively new variety, 
Hawaii. Through the warm months 
the gorgeous wax-like blooms of 
Southern Magnolia (M, grandiflora) 
lend enchanting fragrance to the air, 
giving way in autumn to colorful seed 
cones. Pink Powder Puff (Calliandra 
inaequilatera) imparts a warm glow 
to the transition months from autumn 
to spring, augmented at Christmas by 
trusses of red berries of the California 



T o y o n (Heteromeles arbutifolia) 
trees. 

Green is the background for the 
touches of color, provided by foliage 
and some substantial sweeps of lawn. 
The dominant color comes in many 
shades and forms from the dark-hued 
needles of conifers to the yellow- 
greens of broad-leafed trees and 
shrubs. Choice landscape subjects in- 
clude a 40-year-old Torrey Pine (Pinus 
torreyana) and two valuable specimen 
King Palms (Archontophoenix) . 
Other noteworthy material includes a 
number of Junipers, both twisted (/. 
chinensis torulosa) and prostrate (/. 
horizontalis), California Live Oaks 
(Quercus agrifolia), and a number of 
Indian Laurels (Ficus nitida), a very 
stately tree with lustrous green leaves, 
and a striking Queen Palm (Arecas- 
trum Romanzofianum) from Brazil. 

Problems Considered in Landscaping 

To fully appreciate the merits of 
the garden it is important to recognize 
problems inherent in the area such as 
the relatively low temperature range 
due to nearness of the water, consider- 
able overcast, an abundance of fog, 
and light salt spray from vagrant 
ocean breezes. Problems pertinent to 
this particular garden involve the need 
of low-upkeep material and informal 
plantings that will firmly discourage 
shortcut paths beaten across the points 
of the triangular property. 

The superb landscape setting for the 



DECEMBER, 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



15 



clubhouse defies a capsule description. 
It has elegance, a semblance of hav- 
ing been created by nature, vitality, 
and inviting warmth. It is balanced, 
yet informal, and attractive from every 
angle. Seen from the clubhouse pic- 
ture windows, the plantings frame, but 
do not intrude on a magnificent view 
of the ocean and the lights of Mission 
Beach and Pacific Beach. The garden 
has grown gracefully; not popped up 
overnight. In essence it is a memory 
garden that stirs fond recollections of 
the club's growing years, of notable 
festivities of the past and those who 
participated, and reminiscences of the 
many planning sessions and working 
parties incidental to its development. 

Whereas most 40-year-old gardens 
are sadly dated, reflecting age in 
woody, overgrown material and in the 
varieties shown, this garden is in sharp 
contrast, vividly telling of the fine care 
it has received. The large trees have 
been laced (professionally thinned 
out) to substitute airiness, grace, and 
vigor for density, twiggyness, and 
stunted growth. In addition to en- 
hancing the overall appearance of the 
landscape, this practice greatly reduces 
the hazard of trees being toppled or 
broken under wind stress. The sub- 
ordinate plantings have been rejuven- 
ated by sound pruning and replace- 
ment, as needed, including introduc- 
tion of new and improved varieties. 

Club Efforts for Public Gardens 

Responding to the inspirational im- 
pact of their own lovely garden, the 
civic-minded Thursday Club has acted 
to rejuvenate, dress up, or add ap- 
pointments to some of San Diego's 
best loved public gardens. 

Fountains have an almost magical 
influence on people. It is not fully 
explained by the beauty of the impact 
of lightbeams on graceful plumes of 
water. Quite likely there is an emo- 
tional root, an instinctive appreciation 
of the vital roles in human life played 
by sunlight and sparkling water. At- 
tractive everywhere, they are especially 
lovely in a garden setting amidst birds 
and plantlife. Such thoughts were 
stirring in October of 1965 at the 
ceremony celebrating the restoration, 
commissioned by the Thursday Club, 
of a long-dormant fountain in Balboa 
Park. Built for the exposition of 
1915 and idle since 1935, the weather- 
ing of 50 years had corroded away all 
operating parts and played havoc with 
the fountain's tile basin and plaster 
exterior. More than $3000.00 was 
required to rebuild it, but once again 
it graces a popular rendezvous of park 



goers, the Square of Panama, adjacent 
to the new Timken Gallery. It stands 
at the head of the mall leading from 
the square to the Balboa Park lily 
pond and old botanical building. 

Of interest are the dedication com- 
ments of Douglas Giddings, chairman 
of the city park and recreation board, 
saying, "This is a perfect example of 
citizens' participation in making their 
community a better place in which to 
lve. 

A year after this venture in civic 
beautifkation, the club commissioned, 
at a cost of $1500, construction of 
stonework, a bench, and a bronze 
plaque at the gateway to 30-acre Pre- 
sidio Park. The plaque was inscribed 
with the name of George W. Marston 
who gave the city the park, hallowed 
as the site of the first white settlement 
in California and the site of the first 



mission. 



New Playground at Pepper Gro ve 

The club's civic enterprise for 1967 
involved designing and constructing a 
new playground for children in Balboa 
Park's Pepper Tree Grove, the only 
park area outside the Zoo with picnic 
tables. Among the gnarled trunks of 
the trees that shade this picturesque 
area is a play rocket ship, poised for 
launching, surrounded by a school of 
seahorses, bouncy little creatures on 
coil springs ready to jounce this way 
or that at the bidding of small fry. 
In keeping with the modern age, there 
is a geodesic dome, scaled for the 
climbing adventures of school-age 
youngsters. Top-popularity rating is 
divided between the space-age rocket 
ship, an 'out of this world' plaything 
for aviators to-be, and an imaginative 
'earn-a-ride' slide. Instead of stairs to 
the rim of the slide, children are chal- 
lenged to make their way up a maze 
of webbing. All summer long Pepper 
Tree Grove was just about the most 
popular place in the park, a play para- 
dise for youngsters. 

This last investment aptly illustrates 
a Thursday Club idea, gardens are not 
merely places to be admired, but 
should also be places in which to live 
and play. a 



Botanical +0 Open 

Floral Building on Sundays 

Beginning on Sunday, January 7th, 
and every Sunday thereafter, the Floral 
Building will be staffed by members 
of the San Diego Botanical Garden 
Foundation. 

Visitors will have an opportunity 
to chat with members of the various 
groups, and see displays. The purpose 
is to establish communications and 
goodwill and serve as an information 
center. 

The building will be open to visi- 
tors from noon each Sunday until 5 
p.m. 



Botanical Foundation Elects 

New Officers 

President of the San Diego Bo- 
tanical Foundation, Incorporated, for 
1968 is Howard Voss. Vice president 
will be Samuel Hamill; second vice- 
president, Walter Hepner; treasurer, 
Stanley Miller; and secretary, Mrs. 
William E. Betts Jr. 

Additional trustees are De Graf 
Austin, Walter Andersen, Miss Paul- 
ine des Granges, Roland Hoyt, Joseph 
Jessop, Mrs. Joseph Kenneally, Robert 
Lamp, and Virgil Schade. 

Representatives from twenty garden 
clubs form the Board of Councilors 
of the Botanical Foundation. They 
elect their own officers to be a liaison 
between the clubs and the trustees. 

Officers for the Councilors are: 
chairman, Mr. E. A. O'Bleness; vice- 
chairman, Byron Geer; secretary, Mrs. 
Walter Bunker; and treasurer Arthur 
Day. 

The Councilors have distributed a 
"Design Questionnaire" for the clubs 
to designate their respective desires in 
a garden center building, to be used 
by any designer of a floral center. 



WHEN YOU MOVE 

Send new and old address 

plus zip code to 

CALIFORNIA GARDEN 
Balboa Park, San Diego I, Calif. 92101 



Evanescence 

The moist green of the early leaf 
Casts its shimmering reflection 

In the shaded light of dawn . . . 
A silver trail is Nature's sign 

Of the shellbound traveler so lately 
gone. 

Soon, all will vanish with the sunny 
sky. 

But the very rays that do consume 
Will bring their consolation — 

The rebirth of each small thing. 

— Virginia Novell 



16 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Landscape 

Tour 

Successful 

Palomar District scored a first on 
August 28th in San Diego, when 
their Director collaborated with the 
Chairman, Landscape Design Critics 
Council, in presenting the first of 
the Council-designed-and-sponsored 
Landscape Tours. 

From 9 a.m. 'til 1 p.m., a bus 
load of garden clubbers (including 
CGC 3rd Vice President) and city 
officials toured pre-selected exam- 
ples of good and poor landscape 
designs. The whole tour was con- 
ducted and critiqued by two prom- 
inent San Diego County landscape 
architects, J. J. J. Kennedy and Roy 
H. Seifert, both A.S.L.A. The two 
men kept up running, detailed ex- 
planations arad descriptions on the 
sites as well as in transit; possible 
because the bus was equipped with 
a mike. 

The tour, of a type designed for 
use throughout the state, was enor- 
mously successful in every respect. 
Not only did it fulfill its purpose 
of visual educations in what land- 
scape architecture is and is not, it 
graphically underscored how badly 
abused our land has become and 
served to point out the many differ- 
ent things alerted informed indi- 
viduals and organizations can do to 
protect our remaining lands. It was, 
incidentally, an eye-opener for the 
city officials and, not incidentally, a 
whole lot of fun. 

Three more tours are in the plan- 
ning for the near future. One of 
these will be of a slightly different 
type in that the critiquing will cover 
a whole town. Watch for announce- 
ments. 



SAN DIEGO'S LARGEST 
NURSERY FACILITY 

. . . with complete, personalized at- 
tention to your every garden need. 

flledddia NuM&uf 
and tylabiii 

LINDA YISTA RD. at MOREHA BLVD. 
PHONE 297-4216 




— Photo, Standard Oil Co. of California 

Three southern California landscape architects were honored by the hand- 
scape Design Critics' Council of California Garden Clubs, Inc. at the recent 
Conference of the California Council of Landscape Architects at Asilomar. 
Above, left to right, Mr. /././. Kennedy of San Diego; Mrs. Milton Bell of 
Walnut Creek, first vice president of California Garden Clubs; Mr. Roy H. 
Seifert of San Diego; Mrs. John C. Mathews HI of Coronado, chairman of 
the Landscape Design Critics' Council of CGC; and Mr. Brian Wyckoff of 
Del Mar. 



GOOD LAND DESIGN WINS 
LANDSCAPE AWARDS 



awards of merit were presented 
/\ on October 6th to four mem- 
■*- -*■ bers of the American Society of 
Landscape Architects. These awards, 
voted by the Landscape Design Critics' 
Council of the California Garden 
Clubs, were given for excellence in the 
use and execution of the principles of 
good land design, and were a feature 
of the recent California Council of 
Landscape Architects Conference at 
Asilomar. 

Those honored were: 

Theodore Osmundson, F.A.S.L.A., 
of San Francisco, president of ASLA 
and of CCLA for the land develop- 
ment program for Standard Oil Com- 
pany of California at the 5 55 Market 
Street Building in San Francisco. 

J. J. J. Kennedy, A.S.L.A., of Paci- 
fic Beach, for the landscaping of the 
residence of Mrs. Frank J. Szalay of 
Point Loma, San Diego. 

Roy H. Seifert, A.S.L.A., of San 
Diego, for the land development pro- 
gram at the Carlsbad Junior Ffigh 
School Carlsbad. 

Brian Wyckoff, A.S.L.A., of Pacific 
Beach and Del Mar for the redesigned 



landscaping of the residence of Dr. 
and Mrs. Jack White of Del Mar. 

Mrs. Milton R. Bell of Walnut 
Creek, first vice president of California 
Garden Clubs, Inc., and Mrs. John C. 
Mathews III of Coronado, chairman 
of the Landscape Design Critics' 
Council, made the awards, the first 
given by this group, at the luncheon 
on October 6. 

The Landscape Design Critics' Coun- 
cil members are accredited graduates 
of a national network of Land Design 
schools, sponsored by the National 
Council of Garden Clubs, Inc., with 
branches in each state. The objective 
of the Critics' Council is to seek out 
examples of good land design; to 
afford recognition to individual land- 
scape architects for noteworthy design; 
to continue the education of garden 
club members and of the general pub- 
lic (especially municipal and other 
government agencies) in the need for 
proper land use; and, hopefully, to 
encourage the use of the landscape 
architects's services, commencing with 
the planning stages of private and 
public land development. ■ 



DECEMBER. 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



17 




CLOSE-UP OF "BEST SEEDLING," as yet un- 
named. It is a Spuria with brownish-purple 
standards, falls yellow-centered and heavily 
veined, hybridized by Walker Ferguson of Es- 
condido and grown by Dr. Gordon Loveridge 
of Young, New South Wales, Australia. 



,.:::■. ■■■■ -■:•:■"•■-■.'•■■/, :■■,:--■■■■' 
•■;•..•■■■••'•:■ y - - v ^ .■-■■■ 
■,■■■:.■■■■■■-:■-'■■:,■■:■.■■■■'.■ ^ ^ ":-.■•■: - •--■■• ^ ■ 

. : >",**(;«".,-:".*• :?-■'■:" i •■;. ;. '■:;■;-.. .: /-; v.- JW-;.y ■;,©>'' ; 
:'■..■■■■..-■;.■'.■.. ■■.,•..■ .-.' ^. ;\^ ■ ^ - ■ ■ ' /^ 






Photos by Betty Mackintosh 



FALL 

IRIS 
SHOW 



by Penny Bunker 



T 



HE THIRD FALL show of the San 
Diego-Imperial Counties Iris Society 
was held November 19, 1967 in the 
Floral Building, Balboa Park. It was 
a thoroughly accredited show by the 
American Iris Society, although it was 
classified as a "Cultivar" Show. In 
this type of show, cultivars or named 
varieties are judged together and not 
in a color class alone. This is a rela- 
tively new procedure and this society 
has pioneered in conducting this type 
show. This is the second Fall Show 
plus the large Spring Show that the 
San Diego group has scheduled as a 
"cultivar" show. This gives the older 
favorite iris a chance to win ribbons 
as well as the newer varieties. 

President, Mr. Arthur Day, headed 
the Chairmen for the Show. Assisting 
were Paul Runde, Robert Plott, Sew- 
ard Buckley, and Walter Bunker. 
Awards Chairman was Mrs. Jean Plott; 
Classification Chairman, Mrs. Mildred 
Seward; and Entry & Placement Chair- 
man was Mrs. Margaret Howard. 

American Iris Society judges were 
under the supervision of Mrs. Archie 
Owen of Leucadia who is a Senior 
Judge of Region 15, Southern Cali- 
fornia. Others were Mrs. B. D. Pilley 
of Valley Center and Mr. Arthur Day 
of Chula Vista. 

Queen of the Show was a tall-beard- 
ed named "Chant," entered by Mr. & 
Mrs. George Alexander of Carlsbad. 
The Silver Medal Winner — most first 
place winners — was won by Mr. Robert 
Hubley from La Mirada, California. 
Bronze Medal Winner was won by 



18 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 




WALKER FERGUSON of Escon- 
dido, the hybridizer, admires "Best 
Seedling" and winner of the Car- 
rington perpetual trophy. The grow- 
er is Dr. Gordon Lover idge of 
Young, New South Wales, Australia. 




MR. & MRS. GEORGE ALEXAN- 
DER, winners of the top prize, Best 
in Show, with the copper-toned 
"Chant" visible over Mrs. Alexan- 
der's shoulder. 

Mrs. Raymond Otto of Lakeside, Cali- 
fornia. 

Best Seedling of the Show was won 
by Dr. Gordon Loveridge of Young, 
New South Wales, Australia. This was 
a cross between one of his seedlings 
and Counterpoint (a plant developed 
by Mr. Walker Ferguson of Escon- 
dido.) 

Special Horticultural Awards were 
given to Mrs. Thelma Carrington and 
to Dr. Loveridge for certain seedlings. 
Some 15 blooms were sent from Aus- 
tralia by Air Express by Dr. Love- 
ridge. 

The Artistic Division was won by 
Mr. Bill Gunther of Del Mar. 

Despite weather conditions all fall 
— hot conditions for weeks prior to 
the show, and rain just the night be- 
fore — there were over 90 varieties en- 
tered by some twenty exhibitors. 



Flower Show School 

Scheduled In January 

Interested in flower arrangements, 
flower shows, and horticulture in gen- 
eral ? This school is planned for train- 
ing judges, but is of a great deal of 
value and interest to anyone with floral 
"leanings." 

If you would like to attend, contact 
Mrs. Ralph Rosenberg, 295-1537, or 
Mrs. Harry K. Ford, 583-4320. The 
school is sponsored by the Palomar 
District of California Garden Clubs, 
and will be held at the Floral Building 
on January 26, 27, and 28, 1968. 



County Agricultural 

Inspector Retires 

Wesley W. McCans, Senior Agri- 
cultural Inspector in the San Diego 
County Department of Agriculture, 
retired on December 6, 1967 after 
completing more than thirty years of 
service for the County of San Diego. 

Mr. McCans began his career with 
the Department of Agriculture on Oc- 
tober 1, 1934 as a seasonal weed and 
rodent controlman. He was appointed 
Agricultural Inspector in January, 
1935, and was assigned to work on 
weed and rodent control inspection. 
During the course of his work, Mr. 
McCans helped develop the weed and 
rodent control program and much of 
the equipment used by the Department 
in this field. He also did extensive 
grasshopper control work, and assisted 
in designing and building a unique 
grasshopper bait mixer which was used 
by the Department for many years. 

In 1951 Mr. McCans became resi- 
dent agricultural inspector in Ramona, 
where he took over weed, rodent, and 
grasshopper control inspection for the 
mountain area. In addition, he as- 
sumed the additional duties of plant 
quarantine, fresh fruit and vegetable 
standardization, and nursery and seed 
inspection for the mountain areas. 

During Mr. McCans' long career 
with San Diego County, he has made 
many friends in the agriculture in- 
dustry, and has rendered valuable as- 
sistance to growers and cattlemen in 
helping them to solve agricultural pest 
problems of many kinds. 

Mr. McCans resides in Ramona with 
his wife, Delma. They have three 
married daughters, Marlene, Janet, and 
Weslene, and one son, Dean. Mr. 
McCans and his wife plan on doing 
extensive traveling utilizing their house 
trailer. 



Library Committee 
Appointed 

Books of the extensive library of the 
San Diego Floral Association will in 
the near future be available for circula- 
tion to members, or to be used on the 
premises. 

Inventorying and cataloguing will 
be carried out and the books made 
ready for circulation by the new com- 
mittee comprised of Mrs. Paul 
Witham, chairman; Mrs. Glen R. Orn- 
dorff, Mrs. Herbert Garrelts, Mrs. 
Norman O'Farrell, Mrs. Paul Squire, 
Helen Mattenklodt, and Mrs. Walter 
Bunker. 



Antoiielli Brothers 

TUBEROUS BEGONIAS 

2545 Capitola Road 
Santa Cruz, California 95062 

36-page co/or catalog 25 cents 



Season's Greetings 

from 
WESTVIEW GARDENS 

Tuberous Begonias 
Cardiff-by-the-Sea 



LA MESA NURSERY 

"Everything For The Garden" 

LIVING CHRISTMAS TREES 
CUT CHRISTMAS TREES 

(PLANTATION TYPE) 

FLOCKED TREES 

Christmas Gift Plants 

(FREE WRAPPING) 

Dramatize the garden. 

Nightscape with 12 volt garden lighting. 

Bankamericard Delivery 

8480 La Mesa Blvd. — 466-5703 



CULUGAN 

Serving La Jolla - Pacific Beach 
Mission Beach 

COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL 
SALES • SERVICE 

AUTOMATIC SOFTENERS 

FILTERS 



970 TURQUOISE • PACIFIC BEACH 



DECEMBER, 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



19 



speaking of vegetables — 



GROWING 
VEGETABLES 



by Rosalie Garcia 



TRUCK FARMERS with Spacious 
fields are not the only ones who 
can grow vegetables. Good gar- 
deners can compete in their small 
plots by using the same soils, ferti- 
lizers and general care they lavish on 
ornamental plants. 

It takes the same constant vigilance 
with the hose (irrigating is better for 
most vegetables), fertilizer, mulch, hu- 
mus along with the other chores that 
makes the garden grow. Remember, 
vegetables are ornamental plants too, 
and may make interesting companions 
for your pansies and exotics. Just be- 
cause one eats them is not a sign that 
they are not beautiful ! 

They will do fine in a sunny segre- 
gated spot at the back of a bed. Seeds 
and plants are available in the nur- 
series, but it is harder and harder to 
find the special varieties that one may 
want. For that source it is well to cul- 
tivate one of that breed who saves 
seed and relishes some of the old- 
time varieties. 

The staples one can always have by 
planning a schedule of small plantings 
every few weeks. Lettuces, radishes, 
onions, the cooking greens such as 
spinach, mustard and turnip greens 
are the cool weather ones and should 
be planted now, and at intervals 
until May. The lettuces will stand 
more shade, especially the tender Ro- 
dan, chicory and endive. Full sun 
makes them tough and bitter. 

For quick eating, put out onion sets, 
a few dozen at a time. Stick them in 
any old place, for they will soon be 
gone, and it is rumored that aphids 
can't stand them. All kinds of radishes 
are quick growers so little clumps and 
rows of them tucked in with slow- 
growing and permanent plants will not 
crowd, for they are soon gone. The 
long crisp icicles need more time and 



/T MAY or may not have been psychic com- 
munion between Rosalie Garcia and Arthur Otis 
in November, when both sat down to their type- 
writers and hailed the humble vegetable. In his article 
in the San Diego Union of November 12, Mr. Otis 
reviewed a survey of facts about home gardens and 
gardeners, revealing that in the past year 59% of 
some 5,000 families studied have cut down on 
flowers in favor of vegetables. Rank heresy to the 
flower lovers? Wait, don't despair. There's a note 
of hope for you in the following article by Rosalie 
Garcia expanding on the subject. Seemingly disparate 
garden inhabitants may turn out to be the most lov- 
ing of companions, enhancing each other in un- 
expected ways. 



especially deep loose soil, so give them 
a row to themselves. 

Watch growth closely and learn to 
harvest all vegetables at the proper de- 
gree of maturity. For most, the best 
eating is a stage just preceding full 
maturity, and that is the main reason 
for growing them. Immature vege- 
tables wilt quickly so the commercial 
grower does not harvest until ma- 
turity, and the best time for eating 
has passed. 

The root vegetables lend themselves 
to maturity better than any. (If space 
is limited, skip them.) But a border 
of ferny carrots that reach down al- 
most a foot, and are as crisp as a stick 
candy, is a treat. Marble-sized beets, 
and thimble-sized turnips are delights 
one cannot buy. A dozen or so hills 
of red Irish potatoes dug when the 
size of a walnut and cooked with 
green peas and cream is a dish to 
dream about. 

To have those peas, put up a four- 
foot wire fence or use the divider 
fence with a rich bed beside it and 
plan a series of plantings of edible 
pod or sugar peas, any of the varie- 
ties of shell, and throw in some pink 
and blue sweet peas along for blos- 
soms. Leave a foot between each of 
the first planting and at three-week 
intervals repeat this varied seeding, 
and a continuous supply will come 
along until May. 

The cabbage family has come into 
society since it was realized that brief 
cooking made them palatable and not 
so odoriferous. But the real secret and 
pleasure comes from the fresh-cut type 
popped into the pot for only a few 



minutes. Once the taste buds have 
savored this delight, the cellophane 
package is purely repulsive. When the 
juice of these plants has set, someth- 
ing happens to make them rancid and 
even tough, so they must be caught 
before this occurs. It is best to buy 
plants at the nursery, protect them 
with caps for a week or two, and keep 
the soil well heeled around the plants. 
After a first cutting, pour in some 
fish and fresh humus, and another 
crop is on the way. Brussel sprouts and 
broccoli, and even cabbage will pro- 
duce several crops. 

There are certain vegetables that be- 
long in the variety class and one needs 
only a few, or one of each, such as: 
kale pretty and curly enough to fit into 
any flower bed; Swiss chard; a few 
roots of rhubarb in a well-drained 
nook by a fence. Do not use the 
stems the first year, for the roots need 
them to sustain growth, but after that, 
they should produce for years. 

Don't forget that bugs, worms, 
slugs, snails, aphids and all the pests 
in the book adore tender plants just 
as they peep out of the ground. Since 
poison sprays and especially systemics 
should not touch them, a sprinkling of 
snail (or dry) insecticides spread 
around the plantings will help. Better 
still, cover them with plastic cups or 
sheets until they get a good growth. 
That not only protects them from their 
enemies, but gives the warmth they 
need to get going. 

Use your ingenuity to use the vege- 
table plants for unexpected beauty in 
your garden. 

Good growing and good eating! ■ 



20 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



A Book In The Hand 

Recent Books Reviewed by Garden Club Members 



Creativity in Flower Arrangement; 
by Francis Bode. Hearthside Press, 
Inc., Publishers, New York. 1967. 

What is creativity in flower arrange- 
ment? Francis Bode answers, "Crea- 
tivity is that quality which elevates a 
flower arrangement to a work of art. 
It recognizes the existence of both the 
art and the craft of flower arrange- 
ment which are different but insepar- 
able." 

Throughout the book, she gives 
every reason for one to think just that. 
She states that an arranger can do 
what comes naturally to interpret a 
composition or theme. One's imagina- 
tion and ingenuity can run rampant to 
create the desired effect. 

Craftsmanship is the basis, says Mrs. 
Bode — how to employ mechanics with- 
out appearing to do so. She describes 
containers, bases and stands exten- 
sively, stimulating one's imagination. 
She discusses organic plant materials. 
Choice of accessories is analyzed as 
well as the art of observation, new 
forms, and new words. From the be- 
ginning to the end of her book the 
reader learns what to look for, how to 
care for it, what to do with it, and 
why. Every phase is carefully ex- 
plained and often clarified by refer- 
ring to numbered plates. 

Mrs. Bode's book is an extraordinary 
exposition of mechanics. She not only 
tells one what to do but how to do it, 
in every detail. Everyone, whether a 
novice or an experienced arranger, 
would do well to acquire this book. 
Sometimes we forget what the fun- 
damentals of mechanics are. Once 
thoroughly understood, they bring so 
much more satisfaction, either arrang- 
ing in our homes or in competition for 
flower shows. 

As a personal note (and you may 
react differently!) I don't see "eye to 
eye" with Mrs. Bode's views on figu- 
rines. She writes: "Figurines are hu- 
manizers in design; they relate the 
world of plants to the world of man. 
Because of this, they are always an 
absolute focus in design. They pull 
the eye. Anything of such pre- 
eminence, I believe, must be unique 
and original. There are many statues 
of St. Francis, many mass-produced 
madonnas, which I have seen too often 



ever to see again with a fresh eye. 
I have seen many nice little designs 
including them, but art must be im- 
aginative, fresh, and original; it must 
be more than just pretty." 

I disagree because I have seen many 
mass-produced figurines used in flower 
arrangements and often they were im- 
aginative, dramatic, breathtaking, and 
a glory to behold. Well, agreed, this 
is a matter of opinion, and this is mine. 

Disregarding this one phase of Mrs. 
Bode's presentation, the book gives 
the reader new ideas with stimuli for 
creativity in every chapter. The type is 
large, well-spaced, and easy to read. 
There are many photographs illustrat- 
ing the interesting and informative 
text. 

One needs to re-read this many 
times, because each reading presents 
new ideas one has previously missed. 
I like the book and am happy to say 
I have it in my collection of books on 
flower arranging. 

— Peg Kendall, San Diego 
Floral Association 

Fantastic Trees: Edwin A. Men- 
ninger; The Viking Press, New 
York, 1967. Hard cover, 304 pages, 
$8.95. 

The diverse and bizarre nature of 
arboreal plants of the world is enthu- 
siastically brought before the layman 
by the unique journalistic talents of 
Dr. Menninger. In this book, Dr. 
Menninger has brought the resources 
of the world's expert botanists and 
horticulturists together into a survey 
of the strange characteristics of trees 
all over the world. Many interesting 
black and white photographs fill the 
book, describing many of the oddities 
of the plant kingdom which mere 
words could not describe. 

Various chapters cover the differ- 
ent curiosities of the morphology or 
structure of trees. For instance, there 
is a very interesting chapter on Gigan- 
tism, the evolution of plants into 
larger forms as a result of island iso- 
lation. Other chapters cover the role 
of certain animals in the life cycle of 
some trees, while others note the 
adaptation of plants to the different 
world climates, describing many fascin- 
Continued, next page 




GIVE 

CALIFORNIA 

GARDEN 

FOR CHRISTMAS 

Why not plan your Christmas 
shopping now! Give Cali- 
fornia Garden for six 
Christmas gifts a year to those you 
love and admire the most. Sit down 
now and make your list of garden 
buffs or garden beginners. 

No Christmas mob — no tossed 
merchandise — no frayed nerves or 
aching feet or head — no standing in 
line and paying for gift wrapping — 
no parcel post mailers or express car- 
tons to wrap and tug and haul. 

Do it the easy way. Clip the Sub- 
scription Form to California Garden 
in this issue, and make out your own 
subscription for 1968. Attach your 
list of Gift Subscriptions with name, 
street address, City, State and Zip 
Code, for each gift recipient, with 
$2.50 for U. S. and $3.50 for foreign 
postage (Ask for Airmail rates). Our 
special gift offer is 3 for $5.99 and $2 
for each additional subscription. Mail 
them to the Floral Association office, 
and you will receive a receipt and a 
beautiful, tasteful Gift Announcement 
to mail to each friend as a Christmas 
card. Don't forget your gardener 
either. You might both profit. You 
might even reap a special bonus of a 
bunch of radishes or carnations, grown 
according to California Garden. 

Don't forget your Senior Citizen 
friends, even if bed-ridden or cooped 
in a small apartment or trailer. Cali- 
fornia Garden can bring back a 
whiff of the outdoors and a host of 
memories of their active days. 

Spread color and smiles with Cali- 
fornia Garden as a special gift for 
special people. Do it now — today! 



4^t%0t^ m % 



DECEMBER, 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



21 



Book Reviews 



ating eccentrics among the trees of the 
world. 

The book itself gi\es a touch of 
the unusual to the science of botany 
and demonstrates that plants are not 
commonplace, but are as different and 
unique as the world itself. Much of 
the research for his facts was done at 
the Bailey Hortatorium at Cornell 
University, and Dr. Menninger gives 
credit to scholars all over the world 
for aid in collecting and authenticating 
the strange behavior of the trees that 
he chronicles. An index lists both com- 
mon and scientific names as well as 
the illustrations which add much to 
the facts. Dr Menninger, known as 
the author of Flowering Trees of the 
World and Seaside Plants is the 
brother of the two famous doctors of 
the Menninger Foundation where 
strange human behavior is studied. 

R. MlTCHEL BEAUCHAMP 

Botany Major, 

San Diego State College 



"SOME DO'S AND DONTS" 
FOR A BRIGHT CHRISTMAS 



Ffor all who want to make this 
a "light" Christmas, decoratively 
speaking, it should be encourag- 
ing to know that today's lighting 
equipment and ornaments come in a 
colorful array and are designed for 
safety and convenience. 

So da2zling and varied is the assort- 
ment to be found in electrical shops, 
department, gift and variety stores 
that it could easily be a temptation to 
buy everything in sight. 

The Starting Point 



ney, doorway, windows and porch. 
Study the landscaping. Then, concen- 
trate the decoration on the few fea- 
tures of which your are proudest. 

A doorway is described as the "key- 
note of holiday hospitality," and it 
decorates easily and effectively. Win- 
dows are another "natural," since a 
light in the window is an age-old 
symbol of the season. The family 
Christmas tree placed near a window 
can be enjoyed from both indoors 
and out. 

The house itself may afford the 
Heading the lighting expert's list background for a Christmas display, 
of "do's" is: Start with a plan. Other- and 



wise, the effect may be gaudy rather 
than gay. Cast a critical eye at the 
architecture of the house — the chim- 



A BUMPER CROP OF 
MISCONCEPTIONS ABOUT FOOD 



Naturally, the interest of all of us 
in food gives rise to numerous food 
superstitions and misconceptions, says 
Today's Health Guide, the American 
Medical Association's manual of health 
information for the American family. 

Some tabulations list more than 200 
common modern-day misconceptions 
about food. 

Here are a few of the more common 
fallacies. They're all erroneous — 

If a few vitamins are good, more 
must be better. (Not correct.) 

Never give milk to a patient with 
fever. (The milk won't affect the 
fever at all.) 

Parsnips should be eaten often to 
cleanse the kidneys. (They don't.) 
Beets build blood. (They don't.) 

Pork is indigestible. (It is no more 
indigestible than other meats.) 

Sour foods, such as lemon juice or 
sauerkraut, can cure diabetes. (They 
can't.) 

For treatment of arthritis, grape 
juice, honey, dried poke berries, car- 
rot juice and tomatoes are helpful 
(They're not.) 



Cooked cereals heat the blood. 
(They don't.) 

Warm bread may cause a stroke. 
(It won't.) 

Putting cream in coffee makes the 
coffee more harmful. (No.) 

Ice water causes heart trouble. (It 
doesn't.) 

Raw vegetable juice contains life- 
giving properties, but cooked foods 
are "dead." (Not so.) 

Olives, oysters and raw eggs in- 
crease sexual potency. (They don't.) 

Wine makes blood. (It doesn't.) 

White sugar is not good for the 
health. (Not true.) 

White bread is poisonous. (It 
isn't.) 

If the expectant mother holds her 
weight down, the size of the baby 
will be reduced. (Not a fact.) 

Enriched candy is good for reduc- 
ing. (It isn't.) 

Calories don't count. (They do.) 

Melba toast has no calories. (It 
has.) 

Never eat rabbits because they are 
all disease carriers. (No.) 

Yogurt and brewer's yeast are dietary 
requirements. (They aren't.) 



a broad expanse of lawn often 
serves as a setting for a Christmas 
scene. Such decorations may be child- 
appealing with storybook figures or 
a religious scene. 

To preserve the color and detail of 
outdoor decorations for nighttime 
enjoyment — even those with strings of 
lights — the use of projector spot — or 
floodlight-bulbs is recommended. Pro- 
jector bulbs are made of hard glass 
to withstand bad weather, and there 
are several models of projector bulb- 
holders made for outdoor use. They 
have a ground spike, gasketed socket, 
swivel joint for angling the light and 
rubber-covered cord and plug. 

Indoor Decorations 

Many focal points indoors are 
equally worthy of a decorative touch. 
Buffets, tables, mantels, windows, 
walls, newel posts and handrails are 
mentioned as likely spots for which 
one can buy ready-made lighted orna- 
ments or decorations to which strings 
of lights can be added. 

For those who enjoy making their 
own decorations, there are numerous 
readily-available items to work with, 
such as cardboard, plastics, flower 
pots, embroidery hoops, baskets, vases, 
sheets of foil and angel hair. When 
original designs are combined with gay 
colored lights, they become as atten- 
tion-getting as they deserve to be. 

Know Your Light Bu lbs 

It should be remembered that some 
light bulbs are designed for use in- 
doors only, and others are usable 
either indoors or out. 

It is also advisable to 



mow 



the 



22 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



difference between "series" and 
"multiple" burning tree lights because 
the type of string one now owns de- 
termines the type of bulb to buy for 
replacement. In a "series" string, when 
one bulb fails, all of them will go out, 
and the burned-out bulb must be re- 
placed before the others will light 
again. In a "multiple" burning string, 
each bulb burns independently, and 
even if one bulb fails the others will 
remain lighted. Regardless of the 
type, buy only light strings certified 
by the Underwriters' Laboratories. 

Trimming the Tree With Lights 

When it comes to stringing lights 
on the Christmas tree, these helpful 
hints are offered: To avoid getting all 
snarled up with strings that have been 
packed away since last Christmas, lay 
them on the floor and straighten out 
the kinks before putting them on the 
tree. Make certain that all bulbs are 
burning brightly and that no cords are 
frayed or sockets damaged. Be sure to 
disconnect strings from outlets before 
hanging them on the tree. 

In arranging lights, start at the top 
of the tree and work around and 
down. Place lights on the inside boughs 
first and work from the trunk out- 
ward. After strings are all positioned 
to one's satisfaction, disconnect them 
before hanging the ornaments — again 
working from the top down. 

Avoid overloading the wiring sys- 
tem. If any lights dim when the tree 
is lighted, disconnect other electrical 
equipment while the tree lights are on. 

To keep the tree from drying out 



and becoming a potential hazard, it 
should be kept in a tub or bucket of 
water from the day it is brought home 
until it is taken down. 

To eliminate guesswork about the 
number of lights needed for trees of 
varying heights, the following "form- 
ula" approximates the requirements to 
produce a sparkling effect: Multiply 
height of tree (in feet), by width of 
tree (in feet), by 3. For example: 



Tree Height 


No. of 


(feet) 


Tree Lights 


4 


35 


5 


56 


6 


77 


7 


102 


8 


140 


10 


210 



On the outdoor tree, strings of 
lights are usually an adequate adorn- 
ment, with perhaps a lighted star on 
top. On trees up to 10 feet tall, lights 
should be strung the same as on the 
indoor tree. For taller trees, strings of 
lights may be hung straight down 
from top to bottom on the outside 
branches. 

Safety Firsts 

For outdoor decorating, use only 
sockets, cords, plugs and bulbs manu- 
factured especially for outdoor use. 
When the string is provided with 
washers (also called gaskets) on 
sockets, use them for greater safety. 
On outdoor strings, they keep water 
from seeping into sockets. It is also 
recommended that sockets be hung 
downward on outdoor trees. (On in- 
door strings, the washers keep decora- 
tions, such as tinsel and icicles, from 




getting into the sockets.) 

Use only insulated staples to hold 
strings in place; not nails, tacks or 
brads. When outlining eaves and roof 
peaks, strings of lights will remain 
in place if run through drive rings 
(available at hardware stores) ham- 
mered into the eaves. 

Wiring for Outdoor Lighting 

The lack of permanently-installed 
outdoor wiring need not deter the 
homeowner from going in for lighted 
decorations. There are outdoor-type 
duplex outlets which can be installed 
on the outside of the house. There's 
also a portable power outlet, complete 
with heavy duty cord and two covered 
outlets, which can be spiked into the 
ground and plugged into an outlet 
on the house, or in the house or ga- 
rage. 

If there is no outlet on the house 
exterior, a socket in an entrance fix- 
ture or on a postlight can be used. 
If a cord must be brought through a 
window, drill a hole in a board that 
fits the window snugly, close the win- 
dow on the board and run outdoor- 
type cord through the hole. 

Successful holiday decorating does 
not depend on lavish and costly dis- 
plays. In fact, too big a splurge spoils 
the sincerity of a holiday greeting. ■ 



"First Bill added a string of lights, then Doug, then Bill, then Doug . . .' 



POINT LOMA PHARMACY 

1105 Rosecrans St. 
223-7171 



Your Prescription Specialists 
Since 1935 



Three free deliveries daily: 

except Sunday & Holidays 
11:30, 2:30 and 4:30 

S & H Green Stamps 

featuring 

ELIZABETH ARDEN 

FABERGE 

LAN VI N 

and Other 

Leading Brands 

of Fine Cosmetics 



DECEMBER, 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



23 



PEOPLE 
WHO KNOW 



Use 



ARAGRO 

10-5-5 

Blended with Deodorized 
Organic Fish Concentrate 

ALL PURPOSE 
LIQUID FERTILIZER 

For LAWNS— DICHONDRA 
SHRUBS— FLOWERS 
VEGETABLES— FRUITS 



1 I 












FULL BLOOM 
AHEAD 




u 


se 

ARAGRO 

4-10- 

Blended with Deodorized 
Organic Fish Concentrate 

Specially formulated for 

LARGE FLOWERS 
MORE FRUIT FLAVOR 


8 



WHEN 

NATURE NEEDS 

A HELPING HAND 

— and She Usually Does 



FEED YOUR 
FUCHSIAS — AZALEAS 
LAWNS — DICHONDRA 
AND AFRICAN VIOLETS 

ARAGRO 

FISH EMULSION 





Calendar of Care 



DECEMBER-JANUARY GARDEN TIPS 



To some this time of year means 
a relief from mowing lawns and 
watering the garden. Unless we 
get an abundance of rain, do not let 
plants such as camellias and azaleas 
go dry. The wise gardener will probe 
with an inquisitive shovel or soil tube 
to determine how deep rain has pene- 
trated. Although deciduous trees and 
shrubs have gone dormant the soil 
should not be allowed to go com- 
pletely dry. 

Now is a good time to take stock 

To the true dirt gardener this is a 
time for making improvements in his 
garden, a time of exciting anticipa- 
tion. The nurseries will soon be filled 
with bare root roses, fruit trees, orna- 
mental trees and shrubs. Roses will be 
here in time for Christmas giving. 
Hybridizers have discovered how to 
put fragrance into every rose so we 
can no longer complain about a beau- 
tiful rose because it has no fragrance. 

Don't overlook the flowering fruit 
trees. Nothing is quite so spectacular 
as one of these beauties in your gar- 
den. 

Help your roses rest 

Soon after Christmas, roses will be 
entering upon their longest rest, which 
we can help encourage by removing 
all of their leaves prior to cutting 
back to renew flowering wood. This is 
best done after January 15th (a month 
later in coastal valleys where they may 
receive frost) . Use sharp pruning 
shears and cut out, close to the bud 
union or crown, old wood that has 
done its work and save enough of the 
young canes to renew the bush form, 



by Robert H. Calvin 



selecting for both strength and posi- 
tion. Thus the new canes, soon to 
come, will have room to develop and 
contribute to symmetry. To the skill- 
ful pruner a well-pruned bush has a 
peculiar beauty, because it suggests 
future shapeliness and vigor, while to 
the uninitiated it may be but an ugly 
bunch of prongs and stubs. Try to 
realize the coming benefits and you will 
find a deeper significance in pruning 
and learn how to do it rationally. 

Standard shrubs and fruit trees are 
in a way treated differently from those 
in bush form but the principles of 
pruning to renew wood and maintain 
vigor as well as proper spacing and 
symmetry remain the same. 

Success in growing bare root stock 
or evergreen shrubs and trees depend 
on soil preparation and how carefully 
we follow transplanting instructions. 
Kate Sessions, bless her, always said 
"a five dollar hole for a fifty cent 
plant." 

Watch over -watering 

Use at least one part planter mix to 
nine parts soil. It is a little puzzling 
why so many buy a product and go 
ahead and use it without reading the 
instructions on the bag. Many a plant 
has died from a lack of water because 
the plant was set in planting mix as it 
comes from the bag. If the plant is 
growing in soil in a can the plant 
should be set in a mixture of soil and 
planting mix. The commonest cause 
of dead bedding plants, shrubs, trees 
and fruit trees is in too-frequent water- 
ing after they have been transplanted. 
They should be completely soaked at 



24 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Now Available 



(Ask your nurseryman) 



a few advance plants 



of th« 



ARMSTRONG 



San Diego 



* 



ROSE 



To be officially 
introduced in the 
winter of 1968-69 



*The name is now officially 
registered and approved. 



HANDY 

SOLUTION 

TO AN 

OLD PROBLEM 




the time of transplanting and not 
watered for at least one week. Whether 
it comes from a pony pak or a can or 
it is bare root, the plant can use but 
very little water until it starts sending 
out new roots from the root ball. Also, 
be generous and make large basins 
around newly planted shrubs, trees and 
bare root plants. A little basin is the 
same as growing a plant in a con- 
tainer the same size as the basin. 
Roots cannot go out into dry soil. 

Transplanting Time 

January is one of the best trans- 
planting months for many ornamental 
shrubs and trees as well as deciduous 
fruit trees and roses. Plants set out 
now will be well established by the 
time the hot weather arrives. Rain may 
curtail some of our garden activities, 
but take advantage of the days the 
soil is not too wet to work. The gar- 
dener who plants now will never re- 
gret it. 



You will find many perennial 
flowers in bloom at the nurseries for 
immediate winter color. Set out day 
lilies, lily of the Nile, cannas, Shasta 
Daisy, geranium, including the excit- 
ing and colorful Pelargoniums, ger- 
bera, felicia, acanthus and coral bells. 

You will find camellias in bloom. 
Now is the best time to plant because 
their root systems are not active at this 
time. You will also find Calliandra in 
bloom, Geraldton wax flower, heather, 
poinsettia, winter blooming azaleas, 
flowering quince and deciduous mag- 
nolias. Also start sprouting dahlia and 
tuberous begonia bulbs and tubers to 
obtain bloom next summer. 

All it takes to become a green 
thumb gardener is to prepare your 
soil properly, fertilize when needed, 
get wisdom in watering, and hear 
the sweet music of oh-ing and ah-ing 
of your gardener friends when they 
visit your garden. ■ 





G. S. JOHNSON ROSE NURSERY 

Rose Specialists 

Bare-root Roses - Climbers - and Tree Roses 

available JAN-MAR ... or plant from cans all year 

Spray Materials and Fertilizers 
22 YEARS IN SAME LOCATION 



8606 Graves Ave., Santee 
corner Graves & Prospect 

Open 8 A.M. to 5 :30 P.M. 



Off Highway 67 
Phone: 448-6972 

Closed Wednesdays 



Here's a new easy way to remove 
fallen leaves. It is a labor saving de- 
vice — the equivalent of 10 bushel 
baskets can be gathered in one swoop 
— and it eliminates expensive and 
bulky leaf gathering machines. It can 
easily be stored in a space no larger 
than an auto glove compartment. 

The leaf net is a large 64 square- 
feet durable, lightweight plastic net- 
ting that lies flat on the ground and 
onto which the yard-worker rakes his 
leaves and other debris. When the 
netting is full, he quickly and easily 
gathers the four corners together into 
a compact bag and totes the leaves 



away to the compost pile or to be 
burned. 

Manufactured by the Conwed Cor- 
poration, the leaf net weighs only 
eight ounces. Strong and durable, it 
won't unravel, shrink or absorb mois- 
ture. It's made of super-strong extrud- 
ed plastic netting. It resists rust, rot, 
corrosion and mildew and can be 
cleaned and stored away in the garage 
or basement for next season. 

Priced at $3-98, it is available at 
hardware and department stores or 
can be ordered directly from the man- 
ufacturer, Conwed Corporation, Dept. 
R, 332 Minnesota Street, St. Paul, 
Minnesota. 



DECEMBER, 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



25 



Calendar of Care 



r^\ 



^L> 




by Mary Jane and ]. Wells Hershey, 
San Diego Rose Society 



THERE ARE FOUR WORDS in the 
English language that will make 
any gardener sit up and take 
notice when they are uttered. They 
are as important to him as "Now Hear 
This!" is to the United States Navy. 
They are a signal to take action, a 
reminder to make plans, because 
"NOW IS THE TIME ..." means 
today, right away, now. 

In the world of roses there are items 
that fall under this heading at this 
time. Yes, that is right, Now Is The 
Time: (1) To make plans for your 
rose garden for 1968; (2) to dig holes 
and prepare soil for new plants (See 
last issue of California Garden); 

(3) to let it be known what new rose 
bushes you want Santa to bring you; 

(4) to plant bare root bushes; (5) to 
"clean-up" your garden with a good 
dormant spray; (6) to check your 
garden location for good drainage and 
et cetera, et cetera, et cetera. 

A Few Good Questions 

In the planning of your rose garden, 
have you ever thought of having a 
special rose garden for All American 
roses only? Do you check with your 
nurseryman regarding the height of 
the roses you are purchasing? He can 
tell you the approximate height, and 
the growing habits of most varieties, 
for this is his business. Even flori- 
bundas have different growing heights. 
Have you thought of what new roses 
you want to buy, and what "old dogs 
you want to dig up and throw over 
the fence?" Are you pleased with the 
color variety you have? How many 
bushes do you have of your favorite 
rose ? Have you planted any new roses 
this year — such as the All American 
winners for 1967? Remember them: 
the Floribundas, Gay Princess and 
Roman Holiday, the Hybrid Tea, Be- 
witched, and the Grandiflora, Lady 
Luck? And don't forget the new 
roses, the 1968 All- America Rose Se- 
lections: Miss All-American Beauty, 
hybrid tea, Scarlet Knight, grandiflora, 
and Europeana, jloribunda. The fam- 
ous House of Meilland bred the vivid, 
intense, clear pink Miss All-American 
Beauty and the scarlet-red brilliant, 



velvety Scarlet Knight, while Dutch 
hybridizer Gerrit De Ruiter of Hazer- 
swoude, Holland produced the bril- 
liant, satiny, cardinal red Europeana. 
(Another well-known Meilland rose is 
Peace, the highest rated rose by the 
National Rose Survey and the most 
widely grown rose in America.) 

Planting Bare-root Roses 

Many words and drawings have 
been published concerning the planting 
of a bare root rose, but nothing re- 
places the information gained from the 
actual experience of doing it. You 
have followed the directions for dig- 
ging the hole and preparing the soil (as 
given in the last issue of California 
Garden), you have removed this soil 
again, and have formed a cone of soil 
in the middle of your excavation with 
the tip of the cone level with ground. 

You have carefully chosen a Num- 
ber One bare root rose plant, have 
examined its root system — removing 
only that part of the root that has 
been broken or damaged, and are 
ready to place the apex of the root 
system on top of the cone. Now wait! 
Which direction is South? You look 
at the bud union (that part of the rose 
plant from which the three or four 
strong canes are growing), to see if its 
canes are growing from one side of the 
plant, leaving a vacant space. Yes, 
there it is. Turning the plant so that 
the vacant area is facing South, you 
spread out the roots in their natural 
position and press them gently into the 
soil on the side of the cone. Cover the 
roots with soil, tamping it in, until you 
reach ground level. 

The placement of the bush in this 
manner should assist you in obtaining 
a well formed bush, as in Southern 
California rose bushes tend to grow 
toward the South. Now make a basin 
with the remaining soil, fill it with 
water to settle the soil and to eliminate 
air pockets in the hole. You have 
planted a rose bush ! Your last action 
is to check the bud union to be certain 
that it is well above the ground level 
so that you will have room left for 
your mulch. 



Water the plant every day until 
growth starts. This keeps the wood 
soft and encourages new growth. 
When growth is an inch long, level 
off the basin and water the new rose 
bush the same as the rest of the bed. 

Some rose gardeners plant their bare 
root roses in five gallon cans, as they 
have found that they have a better 
control of the rose bushes and better 
success. Also, it is one way of grow- 
ing new roses without discarding an 
old favorite due to lack of garden 
space. 

The dormant spraying program 
starts the latter part of December. We 
use a good dormant spray on the 
bushes and ground which defoliates 
them exposing the canes. We prune, 
remove and burn all the residues of 
pruning, rake and scrape away last 
year's mulch and then clean it up with 
another good spraying. 

Pruning 

Pruning is usually done in January, 
and the San Diego Rose Society has 
its Annual Rose Bush Pruning Demon- 
stration in Balboa Park at that time. 
This will be published in gardening 
sections of the local newspapers. 
Watch for date and time. Several good 
books have been published on Rose 
Pruning (one by M.M. "Doc" Thomp- 
son, and another by Sunset magazine 
for example), with pictures or draw- 
ings showing you where to cut, and 
telling you why. Be certain the one 
you buy is for Southern California 
area. Take it, plus good sharp clippers 
and a pair of loppers if you have them 
(a lopper is a pruning shears with ex- 
tended handles 20 inches or more), 
and a pair of heavy gloves with you to 
your garden. Study your book, study 
your rose bush and then start. The first 
cut is the hardest! 

Oh, yes, you might tell Santa that 
you would also like gift memberships 
in the San Diego Rose Society and the 
American Rose Society for openers. 

P.S. We have enjoyed the past year 
with you. Hope you have enjoyed it 
too! Happy Holidays! — Mary Jane 
and ]. Wells Hershey. 



26 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



<7^ 



^y 



uu 



by Byron Geer 



San Diego County 
Orchid Society 



KNOW GROW-SHOW 

PLANTS 



G 



ive a subscription to California 
Garden to all your visiting friends 
who marvel at your healthy well-grown 
plants whose names and growth habits 



Midwinter may seem an odd 
time to be thinking about the 
raising of orchids outdoors, 
but the sharp nip in the air serves to 
remind us that orchids are not always 
the tender, hothouse creatures we gen- 
erally consider them to be. 

Indeed, many of the family demand 
low temperatures to grow and flower 
properly, and will gradually waste 
away to nothing if continually kept 
under warm cultural conditions. Others 
will grow like weeds, and you may 
be delighted with the looks of the 
foliage, but don't blame anyone except 
yourself if they pass year after year 
with no flowers! 

The Temperature Factor 

Now for those people who don't be- 
lieve in doing anything halfway, let 
me say right here that I am speaking 
of frost free areas, which includes the 
biggest part of coastal Southern Cali- 
fornia. There are orchids which can 
withstand light frost, but those dis- 
cussed here will be happy with a mini- 
mum night temperature of thirty-five 
degrees. They should be grown in a 
wind-protected spot so that they don't 
have a continual draft of cold air 
around them, and ideally they should 
have some covering over their tops to 
conserve stored radiant heat. Under 
these conditions, there are about forty 
different genera in the orchid family 
that will grow well and bloom pro- 
fusely. 

The Cymbidium 

The first to come to mind, natur- 
ally, is the Cymbidium. These pages 
have been packed for years with in- 
formation on their culture, so we will 
by-pass them with the simple state- 
ment that they are the most commonly 
grown and the most successful of the 
outdoor orchids. 

A genus that is closely allied to the 
Cymbidium in its cultural requirements 
is Zygopetalum of which the species 
Mackayi and intermedium are found in- 
frequently in specialty collections. This 



one is an absolute charmer in the late 
fall and early winter. The growth is 
somewhat like a Cymbidium, but the 
flower is completely different. The 
dorsal and ventral sepals are emerald 
green heavily barred with chocolate 
brown, and the lip is violet and white. 
The combination of colors is attractive 
and unforgettable, and the plant offers 
a dividend in that it is exceedingly 
fragrant with a heavy spice odor. In 
a closed room the perfume is almost 
more than one can stand. Zygopetalum 
should be much more well known, and 
perhaps someday will be discovered by 
the general gardener. 

Epidendrums 

If you are looking for color in your 
garden, truck in a dozen of the reed 
stem Epidendrums and enjoy them 
twelve months of the year. They will 
grow in full sun or partial shade, are 
pest and disease free and available in 
a wide range of tints. Since they are 
terrestrial, the brilliant reds, oranges 
and yellows are a natural for any spot 
of the garden that needs brightening 
up. The flower is small, about three 
quarters of an inch, but they are born 
erect in large panicles with ten to 
thirty all open at one time. Then too, 
they have a nice habit of continuing 
bloom so that new flowers are con- 
stantly opening up on the spike. A 
large container of the reed stem Ep- 
pies is a sight to behold. 

There are about two dozen of the 
genus Epidendrum all told which can 
be grown out of doors. They are 
mostly natives of Central and South 
America with blooming periods ex- 
tending throughout the year. Apart 
from the reed stem types, most of them 
should be grown in pots or on rafts. 
Perfect drainage is essential, as it is 
with most orchids, but standard gar- 
den cultural practices will suit them 
admirably. 



Some outdoor types 

be surprising to many people, 
;ed to many orchid growers, 



It may be surprising to many j 
even indeed to many orchid g\ 



are new to them. They'll admire and 
emulate your skill, — the more as they 
read. 

KNOW your plants, and your 
neighbor's plants so you can recog- 
nize them and call them by name. Join 
Horticultural Classes at the Floral 
Building or the Public Schools Night 
Classes. 

GROW your plants the right way, 
which means knowing how they grew 
in their native environment. Read 
Calendar of Care in the second section 



of California Garden and learn 
daily care from experts. 

SHOW your plants to friends and 
visitors and then enter them in San 
Diego's many Flower Shows. These 
come every few years to your friends 
'Back East' while ours almost pile on 
top of each other every year. 

Be glad you live in 'growing' San 
Diego and celebrate by planning and 
planting a flowering tree or shrub in 
front of your house to tell the world 
as the world drives by. 



DECEMBER, 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



21 



Orchids 

but there are a baker's dozen straight 
Cattleyas successfully grown without 
the aid of a greenhouse. The species 
and primary hybrids generally are 
tough enough to withstand a little in- 
clement weather, but don't stray too 
far into the complex hybrids and ex- 
pect success. The more highly hy- 
bridized they are, the more tender they 
seem to become. 

If we add to this group another 
baker's dozen of the Laelias, however, 
the possibilities become vastly greater. 
The majority of what we call Cattleyas 
today are actually Laelia Cattleya hy- 
brids, and again if we stick to the 
species or with initial Laelia-laelia, 
Laelia-cattleya and Cattleya-cattleya hy- 
brids the chances of raising them suc- 
cessfully out of doors are immensely 
greater. It follows that there is no 
valid reason why this type of orchid 
should not become in time a common 
garden plant. 

Probably the greatest deterrent has 
been the air of mystery and difficulty 
about the growing of orchids which 
was so carefully cultivated for so many 
years. Fortunately, they are no longer 
the exclusive plaything of the wealthy. 

Note the foliag e 

My own favorite among the outdoor 
orchids is unquestionably the Cypri- 
pedium or Ladyslipper Orchid. In 
this case, as with Cymbidiums, they 
refuse to flower if the temperatures 
are not low enough to trigger bloom. 
There are Cypripediums that demand 
greenhouse conditions, and if you are 
going to rush out to buy some be 
careful to secure only those plants 
which have clear green foliage. Those 
with mottled and streaked leaves are 



from warmer climates and won't make 
it without pampering. 

The nice part of this situation is, 
though, that the bigger part of the Cy- 
pripediums raised today are hybrids 
from the cool growing types. Which 
means, of course, that even those that 
are highly hybridized can be grown 
under the cool conditions of the ordi- 
nary garden. There are literally thou- 
sands of Cyps that would be as happy 
in your back yard as some sixty or so 
are in mine. I'm trying a few of the 
mottled leaf types outdoors too, to see 
if they will become acclimated in time. 
So far, they are growing fairly well, 
but last winter was somewhat mild out 
here and I don't know yet what effect 
a cold, hard spell would have on them. 
Perhaps even the mottled leaf varie- 
ties are not as temperamental as we 
have always thought. 

The Odontoglossums 

The Odontoglossums offer a wide 
range of color, size and shape and 
seem to do better for me without heat. 
Most of the Odonts that are now out- 
side were started in the greenhouse 
where they sat and sulked for a year 
or so before I pushed them out into 
the cold, cruel world. They snapped 
out of it, put on good heavy, fat 
growths and bloom their little heads 
off every year. Again, these are usually 
native to Mexico and Central America, 
but from the higher areas where the 
nights are not only chilly but down- 
right cold. They can be very spec- 
tacular orchids too. Anyone who has 
ever seen a well-grown, well-bloomed 



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Phone 463-6344 



Calendar of Care 



plant of Odontoglossum Grande will 
not soon forget it. The flowers are 
about four and one half inches in 
diameter, brilliant lemon yellow barred 
with bronze and last for weeks. And 
this is only one of some ten species 
that will thrive without babying. 

Along with the Odontoglossums we 
generally consider the genus Oncidium. 
They are closely related and frequently 
confused but a little study of the 
flower and growth habits will quickly 
straighten them out. Usually the Onci- 
dium flower is smaller, but the bloom- 
ing is more profuse. Flower spikes six 
feet or more in length bearing up to 
one hundred fifty blossoms are not at 
all uncommon. Within the genus there 
are nine species proven to date for out- 
door growing, and there surely must 
be a dozen more. These have hybrid- 
ized well with the Odontoglossums to 
make Odontocidium, and again, if the 
species do stand up acceptably under 
outdoor conditions the primary hybrids 
should also. Both these genera and 
their hybrids extend bloom period 
throughout the year, so that continual 
bloom in your garden is a distinct 
possibility. 

So, why not try some? 

This doesn't even begin to exhaust 
the list of orchids which prosper under 
what we have always accepted as ad- 
verse conditions. There are about 
thirty genera proven for outdoor use 
that have not even been mentioned. 
Each one has its good points for par- 
ticular application in your garden, and 
each one is worth growing for the 
beauty and the novelty of the plant or 
the blossom. Orchids can tolerate con- 
siderable extremes in their growing 
conditions, and it is only by trial and 
error that current lists can be extended. 

There is at present a tremendous 
increase in interest in the so called 
'botanical' orchids which has encour- 
aged the larger nurseries to stock 
plants of genera that are not gener- 
ally in cultivation. Some of the ma- 
terial mentioned here may not be easy 
to obtain, but there are growers spe- 
cializing now in uncommon plants and 
catalogues are available. A little 
searching will locate almost anything 
you really want. If I can help, give 
me a call at the number listed in the 
California Garden. m 



28 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



Woolly Whitefly 
Found Here 

San Diego County Agricultural 
Commissioner James M. Moon re- 
ports that the entire County of San 
Diego has been proclaimed a Woolly 
Whitefly Eradication Area. This ac- 
tion was taken by State Director of 
Agriculture Earl Coke on October 24, 
1967. 

Several two-man detection crews 
have been inspecting host plants at 
homes from Allied Gardens on the 
north to Imperial Beach on the south, 
and from Point Loma on the west to 
Spring Valley on the east. Inspections 
will be required annually in this area 
for a number of years, according to 
Mr. Moon. 

When either woolly whitefly or 
citrus whitefly is found, the host plants 
are required to be sprayed to control 
the insects. This is done at no charge 
to the home owner. Spraying will be 
done this year by private pest control 
operators hired and supervised by the 
State Department of Agriculture. 
Spraying of all infested blocks will 
begin in December this year, and will 
continue through April of 1968. 

To prevent the spread of these seri- 
ous pests, movement of all varieties of 
citrus, gardenia, privet, Texas um- 
brella, persimmon, lilac, Mexican 
orange, and tree-of -heaven from spray- 
ed areas is restricted by quarantine reg- 
ulations. Violation of the quarantine 
constitutes a misdemeanor. 

Mr. Moon said that his Department 
wishes to thank all residents of the 
infested area for their cooperation in 
helping both the County and the State 
Departments of Agriculture to combat 
these insects. These two whiteflies are 
a serious threat, not only to the Coun- 
ty's large citrus industry, but also to 
nurseries and to landscape and home 
plantings. 



don't leave us behind 

WHEN 

YOU 

MOVE! 

Postal regulations require that you 
pay extra postage on all maga- 
zines forwarded to you at a new 
address. Copies will not be for- 
warded free, and we cannot re- 
place lost copies. 

To insure delivery at your new 
address please notify us now, 

OR SURELY 6 WEEKS IN ADVANCE 
OF your moving. Write in old 
and new address below, if pos- 
sible include the address label 
from your last issue. Thank you. 





rui 



by Larry Sisk, 

San Diego County Dahlia Society 



For most other gardeners, as well 
as dahlia hobbyists, this is the 
season for dreaming and plan- 
ning — dreaming of next year's flowers, 
and planning to get down to the 
necessary gardening jobs any day now. 

The best way to feed the winter gar- 
dening fever is to order seed and plant 
catalogs, and for the specialist — dahlia 
specialist — dahlia catalogs for the new 
year are a must. Otherwise, how would 
he know about all the new varieties ? 

In the garden itself, this is the 
time to start ground preparation. 

Because of favorable weather condi- 
tions along the coast, some dahlia 
growers are just getting around to dig- 
ging, dividing and storing last season's 
roots. The longer the dahlia plants are 
permitted and encouraged to grow, the 
better the roots. 

At time of digging, or as soon there- 
after as convenient, the soil prepara- 
tion begins. In fact, digging the 
clumps starts the soil conditioning cycle 
for next season's flowers. 

If compost has been saved or is 
available, now is the time to spread 
it. Likewise, any kind of humus 
available should be spread now, spaded 
in and wet down. In the absence of 
rain, soaking the composted dahlia 
beds will help break down the added 
material, straw, sawdust, bark, peat 
moss, or whatever. The more humus 
in the soil, the better the crop, regard- 
less of what one grows. 

Even if nothing is added to the soil 
now, the garden should be turned and 



the soil left rough to aerate and to 
receive whatever moisture arrives. 
Turning the soil once or twice more, 
especially if it gets a soaking, will 
make growing conditions even better. 

Home gardeners who have only 
small flower beds and who want to 
have other things growing between 
now and dahlia planting time should 
not deprive themselves of the pleasure; 
just turn the soil thoroughly, add a 
good portion of humus plus composted 
steer fertilizer and/or bone meal, and 
set out plants obtained from the nur- 
sery — petunias, marigolds, or geran- 
iums. Then at dahlia planting time 
these plants can be removed, the soil 
turned and fed again, and away the 
dahlias will go for glorious summer 
color. 

If last year's plants — whatever they 
were — did not grow correctly in spite 
of regular feeding, watering and spray- 
ing, serious doctoring of the soil might 
be considered. Perhaps there was too 
much alkali, which can be determined 
by a soil test. For dahlias a pH of be- 
tween 6.5 and 7 is considered favor- 
able, and if the test shows a more acid 
condition would be desirable, a light 
application of agricultural lime or 
sulphur might be considered. If the 
gardener is unsure, he should confer 
with his nurseryman or a fellow gar- 
dener. 

What About Nematodes? 

In spite of everything else going for 
the coastal gardener, disappointing 
plants might indicate nematodes. A 



454-0404 



CARLSON TRAVEL SERVICE, inc. 



1033 PROSPECT 



A TRAVEL-EXPERIENCED STAFF 

LA JOLLA. CALIFORNIA 92037 




P. O. BOX 1453 



DECEMBER. 1967 - JANUARY, 1968 



29 



sure clue is provided if there are lumps 
and knots on the roots, or if the roots 
just have a sickly appearance. 

If it is nematodes, they can be com- 
batted with fair success : Fumigate with 
Vapam, Telon, or one of the several 
other products available with instruc- 
tions at the nursery. Fumigation of 
the soil can be safe for other parts of 
the flower beds or garden if the fumi- 
gant is kept 20 to 30 inches from 
roots of desirable growth. 

If there is a fear of nematodes, the 
gardener might try one or more of the 
nostrums which at least will help at- 
tain a peace of mind. Plant marigolds, 
for instance; even the U.S. Department 
of Agriculture says marigolds are the 
best of a number of plants tested for 
resistance to nematodes. One might 
fill his flower beds with marigolds now 
to help chase out the nematodes, then 
use the beds for dahlias when time to 
plant in late April or May. 

A very successful Lemon Grove 



758 

Hillside Drive 



Overlooking La Jolla Shores, just 
up the hill from Torrey Pines Road, or 
down the hill from Mt. Soledad, is 
HILLSIDE NURSERY. Whichever ap- 
proach you take, you'll find a WON- 
DERLAND OF PLANTS — rare Be- 
gonias, Philodendrons, Tropicals, fine 
House Plants — a wide variety of well 
grown nursery stock. 

Corey Hogewoning, Prop. 



dahlia grower plants marigolds around 
his dahlia plants and has wonderful 
dahlias, nice marigolds, and no nema- 
todes. (He usually doesn't have 
nematodes, even without the mari- 
golds.) 

Others believe that garlic and 
onions growing nearby will be a bar- 
rier to nematodes. These also are 
said to discourage gophers. 

Still another combatant against the 
soil pests is said to be sugar. In re- 
cent tests, several dahlia growers have 
reported less nematode trouble result- 
ing from use of granulated sugar 
mixed with the soil at planting time. 
The Department of Agriculture tested 
sugar, too, but said it would be too 
costly to be practical: about a pound 
of sugar to a peck of dirt. 

On a small scale that is not so bad; 
just use the mixture for potting soil 
for dahlia cuttings and small varieties 
to be grown in pots. This has been 
proved practical by San Diego growers. 

In dealing with nematodes, in soil 
sterilized with powerful fumigants 
and in tests with the sugar mixture, it 
has been found that roots infested with 
nematodes at time of planting still will 
have nematodes at the end of the 
growing season. In addition there is a 
good chance that the soil will be in- 
fected by the bad roots, too. So, as 
much care as possible should be 
taken to avoid planting infested 
roots, and roots found to be bad 
should be thrown in the trash or 
burned. 

Even if the soil is prepared to the 
point of perfection, there is no sense 
in risking infestation. H 



MISSION HILLS NURSERY 



Camellias - Azaleas 

Since 1924 We Give S&H Green Stamps 

1525 Fort Stockton Drive 



Phone 295-2808 
San Diego 92103 



• LOAMITE 

The Soil Amendment specified by professional 
gardeners and commercial growers 



and 



MILORGANITE 



The only true Organic Fertilizer that supplies the humus 
and necessary nutrients for San Diego soils. 



Did The Aztecs Eat Algae? 

Algae, the microscopic plants grow- 
ing in huge quantities on stagnant 
waters, have been considered as a 
partial solution to the world's food 
problem. Now comes word that the 
idea of using algae as a protein sup- 
plement is not so new after all. Ac- 
cording to the New Scientist, it may 
have been routine in the ancient Aztec 
civilization, in what is now Mexico. 
The population of Tenochlitlan, the 
capital of the Aztec empire, was 
around 250,000 at a conservative esti- 
mate. How was such a large urban 
population fed, in a civilization based 
on primitive farming, where all land 
transport was by human muscle- 
power? The problem has been studied 
by W. V. Farrar of Manchester Uni- 
versity's Institute of Science and Tech- 
nology, who concludes that algae 
growing on the surface of lakes form- 
ed an important and probably an 
essential element in Aztec diet ( Na- 
ture, Vol. 211, p. 341). 

Dr. Farrar quotes 5 contemporary 
accounts of "slime" on the surfaces of 
lakes being made into cakes, dried in 
the sun and eaten like cheeses, which 
they resembled in taste. Remarkably, 
the cakes are described as clear blue 
in color, which shows that they were 
almost certainly made from the blue- 
green algae (the Cyanophyta). 

The Aztec algae were apparently 
able to grow on brackish water, which 
would be a valuable characteristic in 
many food programs. Like some blue- 
green algae today and unlike ordinary, 
green algae, they may have been able 
to obtain some of the nitrogen re- 
quired for their growth by "fixing" it 
from the elemental form, which would 
lessen the need for fertilizers. Blue- 
green algae have a considerably high- 
er protein content than most other 
algae, with a good proportion of es- 
sential amino-acids, concludes the Neiv 
Scientist report. ■ 



Holidays are busy — 
but don't forget 

DEADLINE TIME 

for news, changes, and articles 
to appear in the 
February-March 
California Garden 
is JANUARY 3, 1968 
Send your stories and memos to 
Virginia Norell, 9173 Overton Av- 
enue, San Diego, California 92123. 
If you wish to discuss what you 
would like to contribute, leave a 
message at 277-8893 and it will be 
promptly answered. 



30 



CALIFORNIA GARDEN 



SAH DIEGO FLORAL ASSOCIATM 

FLORAL BUILDING, BALBOA PARK 

(Under the sponsorship of 
The Park and Recreation Dept., City of San Diego) 
Third Tuesday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 

Pres.: Mr. Virgil H. Schade 298-1949 

1633 Pennsylvania 

FLOWER ARRANGERS' GUILD OF SAN DIEGO 

First Thursday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Harry B. Cutler 466-7579 

4671 Toni Lane, S.D. 921 15 

COORDINATING GROUPS 

FLORAL COMMITTEE, 200th ANNIVERSARY, Inc. 

Bi-monthly, 3rd Thursday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Joan Betts, Chairman, Alice Zukor, Co-chairman 

291-1969 
1600 Pacific Hwy, Rm. 801, S.D., Cal. 92101 

SAN DIEGO BOTANICAL GARDEN 
FOUNDATION, Inc. 

Second Thursday, Floral Building 
P.O. Box 12162, S. D.. Calif. 92112 

Pres: Howard Voss 1-753-5415 

1290 Birmingham Dr., Encinitas, Calif. 92024 

AFFILIATE MEMBERS 1967 

COUNTY CIVIC GARDEN CLUB 

Meets every Thursday, 12m to I p.m. 
Garden House, Grape and 101 Civic Center 

Pres.: Mrs. Donald A. Innis 298-1690 

1827 Puterbaugh, S.D. 92103 
Rep.: James Saraceno 274-2628 

3366 Lloyd St., S.D. 92117 

GENERAL DYNAMICS GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: William D. Spann 278-2410 

4101 Mt. Bigelow Wy., S.D. 921 1 1 
Rep. Dir.: J. E. Henderson 274-1754 

3503 Yosemite, S.D. 92109 

MEN'S GARDEN CLUB OF SAN DIEGO CO. 

Fourth Monday, Floral Bldg., 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Jim D. Campbell 278-4372 

2903 Greyling Dr., S.D. 92123 
Rep.: Dr. J. W. Troxell 282-9131 

4950 Canterbury Drive, S.D. 92116 

ORGANIC GARDENING CLUB 

Third Friday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: C. Frank Carpenter 583-1064 

5281 Remington Rd., S.D. 92115 
Rep.: Mrs. Mary Panek 222-5031 

4680 Del Monte Ave., S.D. 92107 
POINT LOMA GARDEN CLUB 
First Friday, Floral Bldg., 10 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Harold A. Skinner 222-1211 

3530 Lowell, S.D. 92106 

Rep.: Mrs. Lorraine Warner 222-9133 

746 Cordova St., S.D. 92107 
SAN DIEGO BONSAI SOCIETY, INC. 
Second Sunday, Floral Bldg., 1-5 p.m. 
Pres.: Mas Takanashi 264-8451 

6655 Detroit St., San Diego 
Rep.: Mrs. Helen G. Howe 
4767i/ 2 Lantana Dr., S.D. 92105 281-1158 

SAN DIEGO CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 
First Saturday, Floral Building, 2 p.m. 
Pres.: Reuben V. Vaughan 223-7629 

1041 Le Roy St.. S.D. 92106 
Rep.: Frank Mousseau 
5955 Lauretta, S.D. 921 10 295-9596 

SAN DIEGO CAMELLIA SOCIETY 

Second Friday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Samuel E. Foster 444-5314 

202 Carter, E| Caion 92020 

Rep.: Mrs. Lester Crowder 295-5871 

3130 Second St., S.D. 92103 
S.D. CHAPTER CALIF. ASS'N NURSERYMEN 
Second and Fourth Thursday, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: John Basney 273-4636 

4731 Conrad Ave., S.D. 92117 
Rep.: John Basney 273-4636 

4731 Conrad Ave., S.D. 92117 
SAN DIEGO COUNTY DAHLIA SOCIETY 
Fourth Tuesday, Floral Building, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Gerald L. Lohmann 295-7645 

4564IA Arizona St., S.D. 92116 
Rep.: Mrs. R. M. Middleton 296-3246 

3944 Centre St.. S.D. 92103 
SD-IMPERIAL COUNTIES IRIS SOCIETY 
Meets 3rd Sunday, Floral Bldg., 2:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Arthur B. Day 422-5172 

279 J St. Chula Vista 92010 

Rep.: Mrs. J. Otto Crocker 582-5316 

4749 Redlands Dr., S.D. 
SAN DIEGO COUNTY ORCHID SOCIETY 
First Tuesday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 
Pres.: Robert Coats 469-6227 

7340 Santa Maria Dr., La Mesa 
Rep.: Byron Geer 279-1191 

5094 Mt. La Platta Dr., S.D. 92117 
SAN DIEGO FUCHSIA SOCIETY 
Second Monday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 
Pres.: William C. Knotts 277-1188 

1912 David St. S.D. 921 1 1 
Rep.: Mrs. William Knotts 
1912 David St., S.D. 921 1 1 277-1188 



SAN DIEGO ROSE SOCIETY 

Third Monday, Floral Building, 8 p.m. 
Pres.: Harry B. Cutler 466-7579 

4671 Toni Lane, S.D. 

Rep.: Mrs. Felix White 264-4440 

5282 Imperial Ave., S.D. 92114 
SOUTHWESTERN GROUP, JUDGES' COUNCIL 
CALIFORNIA GARDEN CLUBS, INC. 
First Wednesday, Floral Building, 10:30 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Harry K. Ford 583-4320 

4851 Lorraine Dr., S.D. 92115 

Rep.: Mrs. Roland S. Hoyt 296-2757 

2271 Ft. Stockton Dr., S.D. 92103 

OTHER GARDEN CLUBS 

ALFRED D. ROBINSON BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Third Friday, Homes of Members, 10 a.m. 

Pres.: Miss Myrle Patterson 224-1572 

4310 Piedmont Dr., S.D. 92107 

BERNARDO BEAUTIFUL & GARDEN CLUB 

First Wednesday, 1:30 Seven Oaks Community 
Center, Bernardo Oaks Dr., Rancho Bernardo 

Pres.: Fred W. Walters 748-1486 

12048 Callado Dr., S.D. 92128 

CARLSBAD GARDEN CLUB 

First Friday, VFW Hall, Carlsbad, 1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Daniel N. Kurily 729-6618 

1430 Forest Ave., Carlsbad 92108 
CHULA VISTA FUCHSIA SOCIETY 

Second Tuesday, Norman Park Recreation 
Center, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mr. August H. Goerke 420-3930 

481 Flower, Chula Vista 92110 

CHULA VISTA GARDEN CLUB 

Meets 3rd Wednesday 1:00 p.m. 

C.V. Woman's Club Bldg., 357 G St., C.V. 

Pres.: Mrs. Benjamin Tate 420-1700 

99 Second St., Chula Vista 92010 

CITY BEAUTIFUL OF SAN DIEGO 

Pres.: Mrs. Raymond E. Smith 488-0830 

4995 Fanuel St., Pacific Beach 92109 
CLAIREMONT GARDEN CLUB 
Meets Third Tuesday, 9:30 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Stanley Fletcher 276-2520 

3090 Chicago St., S.D. 92117 
CORONADO FLORAL ASSOCIATION 
Meets 1st Tuesday, Red Cross Bldg., 1113 Adella 
Lane 
Pres.: Capt. Richard W. Parker, U.S.N. Retired 

435-6454 
508 Glorietta Blvd., Coronado 92118 
CROSS-TOWN GARDEN CLUB 
Third Tuesday, Knights of Columbus Hall, 
3827 43rd St., S.D. 92105, 8 p.m. 
Pres.: Charles Williams 284-2317 

4240 46th, S.D. 92115 
CROWN GARDEN CLUB OF CORONADO 
Fourth Thursday, Red Cross Bldg, 1113 Adella 
Lane, 9:00 a.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Robert H. Keehn 435-8268 

1 1 1 1 Coronado, Coronado 921 18 
DELCADIA GARDEN CLUB 
First Wednesday, Encinitas Union Elementary 
School, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. I. F. Nichols 753-5409 

159 Diana, Leucadia 92046 
DOS VALLES GARDEN CLUB (PAUMA VLY.) 
Meets 2nd Tuesday, Pauma Valley Center 1:30 
Pres.: Mrs. R. B. Davidson 745-9445 

R. I, Box 361, Valley Center 92061 

ESCONDIDO GARDEN CLUB 

3rd Friday, Veterans Memorial Hall 1:00 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Lawrence Mineah 745-9629 

201 S. Upas, Escondido 
FALLBROOK GARDEN CLUB 
Last Thursday, Fallbrook Woman's Clubhouse, 
1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Roman E. Shore 728-7044 

1211 Pepper Tree Lane, Fallbrook 92028 
GROSSMONT GARDEN CLUB 
Second Monday, La Mesa Chamber of Commerce 
Bldg., University Ave., La Mesa 92041 
Pres.: Mrs. James Culver 466-6388 

8558 Boulder Dr., La Mesa 92041 
HIPS and THORNS 
Meets at Members' Homes Quarterly. 

Pres.: Mrs. Eugene Cooper 295-7938 

IMPERIAL BEACH GARDEN CLUB 
3rd Tuesday, Imperial Beach Civic Center, 
1:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Chris Roberts 424-6936 

553 Spruce St., Imperial Beach 92032 
LAKESIDE GARDEN CLUB 
3rd Monday, Lakeside Farm School, 7:30 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Loy M. Smith 443-3089 

9511 Farmington Dr., Lakeside 92040 
LA MESA GARDEN CLUB 

(Garden Sec. Womans' Club) 
3rd Thursday, La Mesa Women's Club, 1:00 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Allen W. Carpenter 583-7508 

5169 Ewing, S.D. 
LAS JARDINERAS 

Third Monday, 10 a.m. Homes of members 
Pres.: Mrs. James I. Robinson 223-0125 

3443 Whittier St., S.D. 92106 
LEMON GROVE WOMAN'S CLUB 
(Garden Section) 

First Tuesday, Lemon Grove Woman's Club 
House, I p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Hal Crow 466-3330 

3850 Quarry Rd., La Mesa 



MISSION GARDEN CLUB 

Meets First Monday, 8 p.m. 

Barbour Hall, Pershing and University 

Pres.: Dr. R. J. McBride 465-1311 

4635 Panorama Drive, La Mesa 
Rep.: Julia Bohe 282-7422 

3145 No. Mt. View Dr., S.D. 92116 

NATIONAL CITY GARDEN CLUB 

Third Wednesday, National City Community 
Bldg., 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Arliss A. Agnew 477-8416 

420 Twelfth St., National City 92050 

NORTH COUNTY ROSE SOCIETY 

Meets First Tuesday, 7:30 p.m. at 
Palomar College 

Pres.: James A. Kirk 748-3870 

15131 Espola Road, Poway 

NORTH COUNTY SHADE PLANT CLUB 

Second Sat., 1:30 p.m. Seacoast Hall, Encinitas 
Pres.: E. Grove Teaney 726-3728 

114 Natal Wy., Vista 

O. C. IT GROW GARDEN CLUB 

Second Wednesday, S. Oceanside School 
Auditorium, 7:30 p.m. 

Pres.: Mr. Earl H. McPherson 729-1785 

3476 Pio Pico Dr., Carslbad, Calif. 92008 

PACIFIC BEACH GARDEN CLUB 

Meet second Monday, 7:30 p.m. Community 
Club House, Gresham and Diamond Sts., 
Pacific Beach 
Pres.: Mrs. Charles E. Domler 283-3642 

5158 Hastings Rd., S.D. 92116 

PALOMAR CACTUS & SUCCULENT SOCIETY 

Third Saturday, I p.m., Palomar College Foreign 
Language Building, Room F22 

Pres. Mrs. Katie McReynolds 755-4047 

P.O. Box III, Del Mar 92014 

PALOMAR ORCHID SOCIETY 

Meets Third Wednesday, 7:30 p.m., Avocado 
Inn, 114 Hillside Terrace, Vista 
Pres.: Eugene A. Casey 753-3571 

932 Crest Drive, Encinitas 

POWAY VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 

2nd Wednesday, 9:30 a.m.. Community Church 

Pres.: Mrs. Ervin Pringle 748-1894 

13517 Poway Rd. #H Poway 92064 

RANCHO SANTE FE GARDEN CLUB 

Second Tuesday— Club House, 2:00 p.m. 

Pres.: Mrs. Edmund T. Price 756-2204 

Box 576, Rancho Santa Fe 92067 

SAN CARLOS GARDEN CLUB 

Fourth Tuesday, San Carlos Club, 6955 Golfcrest 

Drive 
Pres. Mrs. Glenn F. Bliss 463-4349 

6275 Cowles Mountain. San Diego 92119 

SAN DIEGO BRANCH AMERICAN 
BEGONIA SOCIETY 

Fourth Monday, Barbour Hall - Univ & 
Pershing, 8 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Eugene Cooper 295-7938 

4444 Arista Dr., S.D. 92103 

SAN DIEGO BROMELIAD SOCIETY 

Second Monday, 7:30 p.m. Meets at home of 
president 

Pres.: Mrs. Cleoves Hardin 469-3038 

9295 Harness Rd., Spring Valley 92077 

SAN DIEGO WOMEN'S CLUB 
Home & Garden Sec. 

Pres.: Mrs. Lawrence A. Larson 232-8231 

1468 C St.. S.D. 
SAN DIEGUITO GARDEN CLUB 
Third Wednesday, Seacoast Savings Building, 
Encinitas, 10 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Waldo Vogt 755-4772 

773 Barbara Ave., Solana Beach 92075 
SAN MIGUEL BRANCH AMERICAN 
BEGONIA SOCIETY 
First Wed., Youth Center, Lemon Grove 
Pres.: Ferris Jones 466-0138 

4610 68th St., S.D. 
SANTA MARIA VALLEY GARDEN CLUB 
Second Monday, Ramona Women's Club House, 
5th and Main, 9:30 a.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Stanley MacKenzie 789-1135 

R. I, Box 949, Ramona 92065 
SANTEE WOMEN'S CLUB Garden Sec. 
Pres.: Mrs. Leon Roloff 448-0291 

9138 Willow Grove Ave., Santee 92071 
SWEETWATER JUNIOR GARDEN CLUB 
First Monday, 7:30 p.m. Meets at home of 
Temporary President 
Temp. Pres.: Cleoves Hardin 469-3038 

9195 Harness Rd., Spring Valley 92077 
VALLE GARDEN CLUB, POWAY 
Meets 3rd Thursday, 10 a.m. Homes of members 
Pres.: Mrs. Brown Thompson III 
16728 Espola Rd., Poway 92064 
VISTA GARDEN CLUB 
First Friday, Vista Rec. Center 1:00 p.m. 
Pres.: Mrs. Daniel Mich 724-8020 

551 Morningside PL, Vista 92083 

VISTA MESA GARDEN CLUB 

Second Tuesday, 2 p.m. Family Association 
Center 

Pres.: Mrs. Clara Haskins 465-0910 

2352 El Prado, Lemon Grove 92045 



Hazard helps handy 
homeowners have 
heavenly haciendas, 
handsome habitats, 
and hardy hill- 
holders at hardly 
a halfpenny. How 
happily habituating! 









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